Lecture_10,_core_2,2

Lecture_10,_core_2,2 - The Spanish Colonies The Spanish...

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The Spanish Colonies
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The Spanish Caribbean Spanish mariners meet indigenous Tainos (Arawaks): semi sedentary groups Disappointed that Tainos had no spices, silks Indians are eventually forced to pay tribute to Spanish settlers Tribute is usually in the form of labor on gold mines Those who do not submit to Spanish authority are enslaved
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From Mining to Plantation Agriculture Smallpox epidemics begin 1518 Taino society disappears by middle of 16 th century Limited gold production causes new interest in exploiting Caribbean for sugarcane production Requires importation of slaves
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Conquest of Mexico and Peru Spanish conquerors ( conquistadores ) explore other territories, using Caribbean as a springboard Company model Hernán Cortés brings down Aztec empire in Mexico (1519-1521). Why? Smallpox and Indian allies Francisco Pizarro strikes a blow against Incan empire (1532-1533). Not so easily defeated. Many areas remain unconquered for 100s of years: limited Spanish ability to consolidate authority in most of the New World.
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Indigenous Communities under the Spanish Self-governing Maintain social structure with some modifications Maintain language, clothing and diet Pay taxes to the Spanish Adopt Christianity Sometimes sporadic resistance and rebellion, occasionally for strong and violent
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Mining in the Spanish Empire Hunt for gold and silver Conquistadores loot Aztec, Inca treasures and melt them down for their value as raw precious metals Gold not extensive in Spanish holdings, but silver relatively plentiful Extensive employment of natives 1/5 reserved for crown ( quinta ), hugely profitable
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Potosí In 17thc Showing Town below Cerro Rico
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Typical Street Scene of Potosí with colonial Church
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Colonial Potosí Home With Family Shield
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Virgin of Cerro Rico
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Courtyard of Casa de Moneda – Colonial Mint in Potosí
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Traditional Pillars of Hercules on reverse side Plus STP – meaning the Potosí Mint
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Lecture_10,_core_2,2 - The Spanish Colonies The Spanish...

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