The Presidency - Unit 14: The Presidency Unit 14 The...

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Unit 14: The Presidency Unit 14 The Presidency Overview Presidential power has grown considerably since the inception of the Constitution, but especially since the 1930s. The presidency is more than the president. It consists of thousands of staff and numerous offices. The president can rely on a large cohort of advisors and staff to carry out his duties. They are located not only in the White House, but also in the Executive Office of the Presidency since the late 1930s. The considerable resources with which the presidency has been endowed are counterbalance by the even much large federal bureaucracy that the president is nominally in charge of but over which he has limited control. Why then is the president of the United States usually such a powerful political figure in our political system? And why does he seem to have such little power at other times? As you read Bardes Chapter 10, keep these questions in mind. Part of the answer can be found in what you have already learned about the ineffectiveness of Congress. But the
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This note was uploaded on 07/05/2009 for the course PS PS 231 taught by Professor Knight during the Spring '09 term at Chadron State College.

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The Presidency - Unit 14: The Presidency Unit 14 The...

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