chapt 5 outline - 1 Chapter 5 Introduction 2 A. ABC TV,...

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1 Chapter 5 Introduction
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2 A. ABC TV, Urban Institute found discrimination persists against African Americans B. "Full equality is far from being a universal condition of American life" C. "Equal rights" or "civil rights" 1. Members of differing groups treated equally by government/private parties? 2. Right of every person to equal protection under laws 3. Equal access to society's opportunities/public facilities D. The chapter's main points: 1. Disadvantaged groups have struggled for equal rights 2. Americans have attained substantial equality under the law 3. Legal equality for all Americans has not led to de facto equality The Struggle For Equality A. Introduction 1. Jefferson: Equality meant similar moral worth and equal legal treatment a. Slaves were not entitled to legal equality b. Equality: the powerful seldom bestow it on the less powerful B. African Americans 1. Introduction a. Civil War did not end "institutionalized racism" b. Plessyv.Ferguson (1896) justified "separate and unequal" treatment 2. The Brown Decision (1954) reversed Plessy doctrine a. Majority of southern whites opposed decision b. Southern Manifesto governors planned to resist forced integration c. Slim majority of whites outside South agreed with decision 3. The Black Civil Rights Movement a. King's nonviolent Birmingham protest in 1963 b. King's "I have a dream" speech (August, 1963) c. Civil Rights Act of 1964; 1965 Voting Rights Act 4. The Aftermath of the Civil Rights Movement a. King's dream of a color-blind society has remained elusive b. African Americans have made substantial progress since the 1960's is the winning of election to public office C. Women 1. Introduction
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3 a. English common-law tradition of political disregard for women i. Women could not vote, hold public office, serve on juries b. 1848: first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York c. Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 gave women right to vote 2. Women's Legal and Political Gains a. Equal Rights Amendment failed, three states short of ratification (1982) b. Equal Pay Act of 1973 and Civil Rights Act of 1964 c. Title IX prohibits sex discrimination in education d. Women have made gains in appointive/elective offices i. Sandra Day O'Connor first woman on Supreme Court
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chapt 5 outline - 1 Chapter 5 Introduction 2 A. ABC TV,...

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