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20_Civil_Liberties_64_slides

20_Civil_Liberties_64_slides - Civil Liberties Protecting...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Civil Liberties: Protecting Individual Rights Chapter 20 Section 1 Due Process of Law
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Due Process n The government cannot deprive  anyone of “life, liberty or property,  without due process.” n The government must act fairly,  using fair laws, with fair  procedures.
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Substantive Due Process n Sometimes governments pass laws  which are not constitutional n Skinner v. OK, 1942 – OK required  all felons with 3 convictions to be  castrated n It was overturned as  unconstitutional and the law was  thrown out
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Substantive Due Process n Pierce v. Society of Sisters, 1925 –  the law required all students to  attend public school, destroying  private and parochial schools n The court threw out the law. n Students may attend any school for  their education.
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Procedural Due Process n Sometimes governments pass good  laws but are poorly implemented n Rochin v. CA, 1952 – Rochin  swallowed drugs and had his  stomach pumped to get it n Police may not invade a person to  get evidence
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Procedural Due Process n Miranda v. AZ, 1966 – Miranda  confessed to rape without  knowledge that he could get an  attorney. n The portion of the law that was not  followed was eliminated and  Miranda received a new trial.
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Police Power n The police are the ‘middle men’  between governmental laws and the  public. n They are responsible to promote the  public health, safety, morals and  general welfare n Conflicts arise frequently
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Testing for Drunkenness n What are the correct procedures to  determine sobriety? n Breathalyzer  n Walk a line n Touch your nose n Blood test n All have been or are being used
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Testing for Drunkenness n Courts usually side with the police  in order to protect the public from  drunk drivers. n Schmerber v. CA, 1966 – found it ok  to draw blood to check for alcohol  content
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Other Laws n States can limit the sale of alcoholic  beverages and tobacco, make laws  to combat pollution and require  vaccinations n States can forbid concealed  weapons, require seat belt use, and  punish drunk drivers
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Other Laws n States can regulate gambling and   out law the sale of pornography and  prostitution. n States can require compulsory  education, provide medical care and  limit the profits of untility  companies.
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Rights of Privacy n The Constitution grants us the “right  to be let alone” n Griswold v. CN, 1965 – found a state  law prohibiting birth control  counseling and all devises to be  unlawful n The Courts cannot police bedrooms
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Roe v. Wade, 1973 n Texas made abortion a crime n The USSC found the law  unconstitutional n Woman may receive an abortion in  the first trimester (3 mo) n The state can make restrictions for  woman to receive an abortion in the  second trimester (6 mo)
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Roe v. Wade, 1973
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