ss-gles-glossary

ss-gles-glossary - Glossary Note: The following terms and...

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Glossary Note: The following terms and definitions are not meant to be a comprehensive list of essential concepts and ideas in social studies, but rather they are words stated in the GLEs that require further explanation. Accuracy— The quality of being free from errors, mistakes, or distortion; consistent with fact or truth. Agriculture— The practice or work of farming. Analyze— To break material into its constituent parts and determine how the parts relate to one another and to an overall structure or purpose. Assumptions— A statement accepted or supposed as true without proof or demonstration; an unstated premise or belief. Apply— The skill of selecting and using information in other situations or problems. B.C.E.— A chronological designation meaning “before the common era.” This document uses the chronological designations B.C.E. (before the common era) and C.E. (common era). These labels correspond to B.C. (before Christ) and A.D. (anno Domini), which are used in some social studies instructional materials. Benefits— Monetary or non monetary gain received because of an action taken or a decision made. Bill of Rights— The first ten amendments to the Constitution. Ratified in 1791, these amendments limit governmental power and protect basic rights and liberties of individuals. Breadth— The quality of addressing a range of perspectives. Checks and balances— Constitutional mechanisms that authorize each branch of government to share powers with the other branches and thereby check their activities. Citizenship— A concern for the rights, responsibilities, and tasks associated with governing; the status of being a citizen as well as membership in a community and the quality of an individual’s response to membership in a community. Clarity— The quality of making something easier to understand; freeing from confusion or ambiguity, to remove obscurities. C.E.— A chronological designation meaning “common era.” This document uses the chronological designations B.C.E. (before the common era) and C.E. (common era). These labels correspond to B.C. (before Christ) and A.D. (anno Domini), which are used in some social studies instructional materials. Colonies— Countries or areas controlled politically by a more powerful country. The GLE document refers on several occasions to the 13 British colonies in North America. Common good— Benefit or interest of a politically organized society as a whole. Comparative advantage— Country’s ability to produce a given product relatively more efficiently than another country; production at a lower opportunity cost. Compare— Show how things are similar or different. Computer-based mapping system— Technological tools used to analyze geographic data in a variety of ways. Geographic Information Systems (G.I.S.) is one example. Concept—
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2009 for the course BUS BAM303 taught by Professor Na during the Spring '09 term at 東京大学.

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ss-gles-glossary - Glossary Note: The following terms and...

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