ESPM_115C_Syllabus_2020 (2).pdf - Fish Ecology 2019 ESPM C115C IB C176L Syllabus Lecture Tues\/Thurs from 10:10-11:00 in Mulford 132 Lab

ESPM_115C_Syllabus_2020 (2).pdf - Fish Ecology 2019 ESPM...

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Fish Ecology 2019 ESPM C115C / IB C176L Syllabus Lecture: Tues/Thurs from 10:10-11:00 in Mulford 132 Lab: Tuesdays/Thursdays 1:10-4 in Mulford 36 Goal: Most fisheries problems occur and are addressed in definable habitats, though migratory species depend on several habitats. Fish Ecology’s goal is to examine a variety of North American aquatic habitats and explain the physical factors (such as temperature, substrate, salinity, etc.), biotic factors (chiefly predation and competition), and human-related factors (dams, pollution, water removal, fishing, logging, etc.) that affect the distribution and abundance of fishes. We will thus explore the ways in which the important themes of basic and applied ecology are played out in different aquatic habitats. Fish Ecology will focus on North American habitats but there will be a strong emphasis on California because 1) we have best access to the information, 2) students can identify with these habitats, 3) this focus will help them in their careers, and 4) we have several representative habitats to examine near campus. This course will teach students to link general ecological principles with specific habitats and species. It will deal with applied aspects such as invasive species, fishing, and habitat alteration but will be designed around habitats rather than specific land-use and management issues. Linkages will be drawn between habitats by both their physical aspects (flow from stream to river or lake, riverine and tidal aspects of estuaries, etc.) and biological aspects such as migration between habitats. Instructor: Stephanie Carlson [email protected] GSIs: Emily Chen [email protected] Rachael Ryan [email protected] Office Hours: Stephanie Carlson: Mondays 2-3pm, Wellman 305 Rachael Ryan: Wednesdays 9-10am, Mulford 36 Emily Chen: Wednesdays 3-4pm, Mulford 36 bCourses site: Look here for course information, datasets, and weekly readings and quizzes Course Affordability: To reduce costs, we post weekly readings from the primary literature to bCourses. Additionally, we have placed two relevant texts on reserve at the Biosciences Library (“Inland Fishes of California” by Moyle (2002) and “Fishes: An introduction to ichthyology” by Moyle and Cech (2004)). The lab manual is available at Vick Copy on Euclid (~$10). Course Meetings: There will be two lectures and one lab session per week. The lectures are scheduled from 10:10am-11:00am on Tuesdays and Thursday, followed by a 3 h lab from 1:00-4:00pm on Tuesdays or Thursdays. Lab sessions are mandatory and will be used for learning dichotomous keys, the inland fishes of California, and analysis and presentation of data from field trips and field exercises. The specific schedule will be announced in class. Responsibilities: The responsibilities of the instructor and teaching assistantsare to: (1) present relevant information and concepts in a stimulating manner; (2) organize field and laboratory experiences that expand and enhance course topics; (3) teach students to synthesize data and concepts, and present this material in a standard scientific format.
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