BC_MC_Test_09_ans

BC_MC_Test_09_ans - Chapter 9 WRITING NEGATIVE MESSAGES...

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135 Chapter 9 WRITING NEGATIVE MESSAGES Multiple Choice 1. When composing a negative message, you should try to a. choose a buffer that will distract your reader from the main point of your message. b. gain the audience’s acceptance of the bad news. c. leave the reader with hope that you will change your decision. d. do all of the above. ANSWER: b; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 254; TYPE: concept 2. Which of the following would be an inappropriate use of the word “you” in a negative letter? a. You possess many fine skills. b. The frying pan you ordered is being shipped today. c. You shouldn’t have washed that wool shirt; it should be dry cleaned only. d. When you have more managerial experience, we encourage you to reapply. ANSWER: c; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 255; TYPE: application 3. Use the direct approach with a negative message if a. the message will have a great deal of personal impact on members of the audience. b. the situation is one in which people readily acknowledge the possibility of receiving bad news. c. an order is unfillable or portions of it must be back-ordered. d. you are refusing to make an adjustment on a claim. ANSWER: b; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 256; TYPE: concept 4. When using the direct approach to deliver bad news, you a. begin with a buffer. b. do not include reasons for the decision or information. c. must still work to end with a positive statement. d. can expect your audience to be offended. ANSWER: c; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 258; TYPE: concept
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5. When using the direct approach to deliver bad news, the closing should include a. an explanation for the bad news. b. an action step for those who want to appeal or contest the bad news. c. a positive, but still honest and respectful, statement. d. an apology. ANSWER: c; DIFFICULTY: moderate: PAGE: 258; TYPE: concept 6. Instead of beginning your negative message with a blunt announcement of the news, you can use a. the direct approach. b. a buffer. c. a combination of the direct and indirect approaches. d. the deductive approach. ANSWER: b; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 259; TYPE: concept 7. A poorly written buffer can a. trivialize the reader’s concerns. b. divert attention away from the problem. c. mislead the reader into thinking good news follows. d. do all of the above. ANSWER: d; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 259; TYPE: concept 8. The buffer of a negative message a. should be neutral and noncontroversial. b. implicitly says no. c. apologizes. d. should be very vague about the subject of the message. ANSWER: a; DIFFICULTY: moderate; PAGE: 259; TYPE: concept 9. If you are responding negatively to a request, a buffer a. comes right out and says no. b.
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2009 for the course BUS BAM316 taught by Professor Na during the Spring '09 term at 東京大学.

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BC_MC_Test_09_ans - Chapter 9 WRITING NEGATIVE MESSAGES...

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