Chapter 8 Lecture

Chapter 8 Lecture - Chapter 8 Chemical Bonding Questions...

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Chemical Bonding Chapter 8
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Questions for consideration 1. How can we classify the types of bonding of different compounds? 2. What is the nature of bonding in ionic compounds? 3. What is the nature of bonding in molecular compounds? 4. How can we predict and explain the shapes of molecular compounds and polyatomic ions?
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A general comparison of metals and nonmetals.
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Types of Chemical Bonding 1. Metal with nonmetal: electron transfer and ionic bonding 2. Nonmetal with nonmetal: electron sharing and covalent bonding 3. Metal with metal: electron pooling and metallic bonding
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The three models of chemical bonding.
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General Properties of Ionic and Covalent Compounds Ionic Covalent Crystalline solids Gases, liquids, or solids Hard, brittle solids Weak, brittle solids or soft and waxy solids Very high melting point Low melting point Very high boiling point Low boiling point Good electrical conductor when molten or in solution Poor conductor of electricity and heat Often soluble in water but not in carbon tetrachloride Often soluble in carbon tetrachloride but not in water
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Lewis Electron-Dot Symbols For main group elements - Example: Nitrogen, N, is in Group 5A and therefore has 5 valence electrons. N : . . . : N . . . . N : . . N . . . The A group number gives the number of valence electrons. Place one dot per valence electron on each of the four sides of the element symbol. Pair the dots (electrons) until all of the valence electrons are used.
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Lewis electron-dot symbols for elements in Periods 2 and 3.
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Li 1s 2 2s 1 Orbital diagrams Lewis electron-dot symbols + F 1s 2 2s 2 2p 5 Li + 1s 2 + F - 1s 2 2s 2 2p 6 Three ways to represent the formation of Li + and F - through electron transfer. Li
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2009 for the course CHEM 1021 taught by Professor Hoenigman, during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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Chapter 8 Lecture - Chapter 8 Chemical Bonding Questions...

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