Chapter 5 Lecture

Chapter 5 Lecture - Chapter 5 Chemical Reactions and...

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Chemical Reactions and Equations Chapter 5
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Questions for consideration 1. What happens in a chemical reaction? 2. How do when know whether a chemical reaction takes place? 3. How do we represent a chemical reaction with a chemical equation? 4. How are chemical reactions classified? How can the products of different classes of chemical reactions be predicted? 5. How do we represent chemical reactions in aqueous solution?
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Chemical Equations C + O 2 CO 2 • Substances on left – Reactants – Starting materials • Substances on right – Products • + “and” “reacts to produce”
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Reading a Chemical Reaction C (s) + O 2(g) CO 2(g) • (s) solid • (l) liquid • (g) gas • (aq) aqueous or in water
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A Microscopic View Chemical Reaction
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Identify the reactant and the product You mix a solution of sulfuric acid and solid calcium carbonate. Carbon dioxide gas bubbled out of the solution as the initial solid disappeared, leaving behind a deposit of calcium sulfate.
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How do we know a chemical reaction occurs? 5 -
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Physical Clues of a Chemical Reaction The most common evidence of a chemical reaction is: Change in color Production of light Formation of a solid (such as a precipitate in solution, or smoke in air, or a metal coating) Formation of a gas (bubbles in solution or fumes in the gaseous state) Absorption or release of heat (sometimes appearing as a flame) 5 -
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The total mass of substances does not change during a chemical reaction. reactant 1 + reactant 2 product total mass total mass = calcium oxide + carbon dioxide calcium carbonate CaO + CO 2 CaCO 3 56.08g + 44.00g 100.08g Law of Mass Conservation:
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Balancing Chemical Equations • Must have the same number of each element on both sides of the equation
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translate the statement balance the atoms specify states of matter adjust the coefficients check the atom balance
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Balancing Equations Balance the following equation, which represents the chemical reaction involved when an airbag deploys: NaN 3 (s) N 2 (g) + Na (s)
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When the equation below is balanced, the coefficient of sulfuric acid, H 2 SO 4 is: NaCN (s) + H 2 SO 4 (aq) → Na 2 SO 4 (aq) + HCN (g) Balancing Equations
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This note was uploaded on 07/06/2009 for the course CHEM 1021 taught by Professor Hoenigman, during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

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Chapter 5 Lecture - Chapter 5 Chemical Reactions and...

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