Chapter 3 Lecture

Chapter 3 Lecture - Chapter 3 Chemical Compounds Questions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chemical Compounds Chapter 3
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Questions for consideration 1. How do ionic compounds differ from molecular compounds? 2. What kinds of ions are in ionic compounds? 3. What do formulas of ionic compounds represent? 4. How are ionic compounds named? 5. What do formulas of molecular compounds represent and how are they named?
Background image of page 2
Questions for consideration 6. What are some common acids and bases and how are they named? 7. How can naming different kinds of compounds be compared?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The formation of an ionic compound. Transferring electrons from the atoms of one element to those of another results in an ionic compound.
Background image of page 4
Sodium chloride animation
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Formation of a covalent bond between two H atoms. Covalent bonds form when elements share electrons, which usually occurs between nonmetals (molecular compound).
Background image of page 6
Ionic vs. covalent animation
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Elements that occur as molecules. 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A 6A 7A 8A (1) (2) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) H 2 N 2 O 2 F 2 P 4 S 8 Cl 2 Se 8 Br 2 I 2 diatomic molecules tetratomic molecules octatomic molecules
Background image of page 8
Electron distribution in molecules of H 2 and H 2 O.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The dissolution of an ionic compound animation
Background image of page 10
NaCl dissolution animation
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The electrical conductivity of ionic solutions animation
Background image of page 12
Definitions Electrolyte – substance that releases ions when dissolved in water; conducts electricity (ionic compounds) Strong electrolyte – dissociates extensively in water; conducts electricity well Weak electrolyte – dissociates partially in water; does not conduct electricity well Nonelectrolyte – substance that does not release ions when dissolved in water; does not conducts electricity (most molecular compounds)
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Entities in covalent and ionic substances Most covalent substances consist of molecules No molecules exist in a sample of an ionic compound
Background image of page 14
Based on their formulas, which of the following compounds are ionic? a) KCl
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/06/2009 for the course CHEM 1021 taught by Professor Hoenigman, during the Spring '07 term at Colorado.

Page1 / 45

Chapter 3 Lecture - Chapter 3 Chemical Compounds Questions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 16. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online