Lecture 14 - Cytoplasmic inheritance v3

Lecture 14 - Cytoplasmic inheritance v3 - Hand in exams for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hand in exams for regrade by Friday May 9 Instructions: Paper clip to the front of your exam a sheet listing which problem (sections) you want regraded. Do not list reasons or arguments. What you will get is a fresh look at the question. Pass this package to John or Andrew or the Core office (LS 2305).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture 14 – Cytoplasmic Inheritance Non-Mendelian pattern of inheritance Biparental inheritance Trait is transmitted through either parent. More typical in unicellular organisms Uniparental inheritance Trait is transmitted from either male (paternal inheritance) or, more often in multicellular organisms, female (maternal inheritance) parent. Cytoplasmic heredity is contributed by the mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes in eukaryotic cells.
Background image of page 2
Mechanisms of uniparental inheritance Differences in gamete size (passive) Degradation of organelles in male gametes of some organisms In some plants, paternal organelle genomes are distributed to cells that are destined to not become part of the embryo during early development. In some organisms, the zygote destroys paternal organelle after fertilization. Other organisms, paternal organelles, excluded from female gamete
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Origin and evolution of organelle genomes Endosymbiont theory (1970s) Lynn Margulis Origin of mitochondrion and chloroplast: Ancient eukaryotic cell engulfed bacterium and established symbiotic relationship more than a billion years ago. Molecular evidence Genomic DNA persists in chloroplast and mitochondrion Organization of mtDNA and cpDNA more similar to prokaryotes than eukaryotic nuclear chromosomes. Mitochondrial genomes use N -formyl methionine and tRNA fmet in translation initiation. Inhibitors of bacterial translation --antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol and erythromycin-- effect mitochondrial translation and not eukaryotic cytoplasmic protein synthesis. DNA sequence phylogeny: mtDNA is derived from gram-negative nonsulfur purple bacterium cpDNA is derived from cyanobacterium
Background image of page 4
Plastid 6 CO 2 + 6 H 2 O C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6 O 2 photons Plastid Synthesis of essential aromatic amino acids. Synthesis of essential vitamins, such as vitamin K. Chloroplast 1) Captures solar energy and store it in carbohydrates. Elaioplast Synthesis and storage of lipids Amyloplast Synthesis and storage of starch Chromoplast Synthesis and storage of pigments
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Plastid genome Fig 16.7 Liverwort Circular, compact genome reminiscent of bacterial genome. .. or phage genome. ~100 proteins encoded by
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/08/2009 for the course LIFESCI ls 4 taught by Professor Merriam during the Winter '08 term at UCLA.

Page1 / 29

Lecture 14 - Cytoplasmic inheritance v3 - Hand in exams for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online