Chap12-1_volti

Chap12-1_volti - STS 101 Chapter 12 Click to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style STS 101 Chapter 12
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Forms of Electronic media The telegraph showed up in 1844 Telegraph succeeded in uniting distant locales, regulating railroad traffic, and transmitting the news around the world. But telegraph was limited by the need for trained operators (who knew Morse code) as well as the large investment in the wires strung on telegraph poles
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Better the Pony Express
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Radio followed Radio transmission and reception was first developed by Heinrich Hertz in the attempt to confirm James Clerk Maxwell's contention that electrical waves traveled at the speed of light.
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It required more technology In the early days, radio communication was limited to the familiar dots and dashes of telegraphy; no audible sound could be transmitted and received. Communication of audible sounds was achieved only when Ronald Fessenden applied the heterodyne principle to radio as well as the development of better equipment for the transmission and reception of radio waves, including the diode and the triode.
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Radio was not created for In its early days, radio was seldom regarded as a means of providing information and entertainment. Most applications were replacements for the telegraph: ship-to-shore communications and transatlantic transmissions.
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War always helps to improve Radio was also employed in military applications, and World War I stimulated a number of improvements. In the 1920's, radio development was stimulated as large numbers of amateurs built their own transmission and reception sets, chattering away through the air-waves with one another, and generally exploring the potential of the new medium.
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The Origins of Commercial Radio It was not long, however, until commercial interests noted the potential of radio and, with the realization that the availability of regular programming would stimulate the market for its radio sets. The Westinghouse Corporation started the first radio station in 1920, with its premier program being the reporting of the results of the November 1920 presidential election.
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Entertainment soon followed The first of these were low-budget affairs as phonographs were played without paying any royalties and live performers sang for free. Soon the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers filed a lawsuit seeking royalties for the broadcast of recorded music and, when it won, live performers began seeking recompense as well.
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Two different paths were followed In Great Britain, a national radio system was established and the expenses were defrayed not by advertising but by requiring that every set owner buy a license. In the United States, free commerce ruled the day, and the costs of broadcasting were offset by advertising revenues.
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But people wanted images The dream of broadcasting moving pictures of distant events had been around since the late 19th Century and, in 1907, the term ‘television' was first introduced for a method of doing so in the pages of Scientific American .
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This note was uploaded on 07/08/2009 for the course ENGL 101 taught by Professor Volti during the Spring '09 term at Clemson.

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Chap12-1_volti - STS 101 Chapter 12 Click to edit Master...

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