206.18 Wordsworth.pdf - William Wordsworth(1770-1850 \u2022\u202f \u2022\u202f \u2022\u202f \u2022\u202f \u2022\u202f Born in the Lake District(Cumberland county 1770 Attends

206.18 Wordsworth.pdf - William Wordsworth(1770-1850...

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William Wordsworth (1770-1850)
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Born in the Lake District (Cumberland county) 1770 Attends Cambridge University 1787-91 Lives in Somerset 1797-8; publishes Lyrical Ballads, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1798 Returns to Lake District with Dorothy and sets up house at Dove Cottage, Grasmere 1799 Moves to Rydal Mount 1813
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Orléans Dieppe Calais Annette Vallon and daughter Anne Caroline Wordswodsth (b. Dec. 1792)
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Dove Cottage, Grasmere the Wordsworth’s home 1799 to 1809, now a museum. Recent photo (above) and in 1920 (left)
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Rydal Mount, Westmorland Wordsworth’s home from 1813 until death in 1850
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Rydal Mount today: a popular tourist destination
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William Wordsworth 1770-1850 Poet of nature and the human affections Poet of the mind Poetry celebrated for its healing power, the visionary power of its language, and for its moral philosophy Poetry explores the imaginative relation between memory and consolation Poetry expresses the beginnings of modern subjectivity Henry William Pickersgill, 1850 (National Portrait Gallery, London)
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Lyrical Ballads , 1798 Published anonymously Collaboration between Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge “experiments” in a variety of forms and genres (not just ballads or lyrics) intended as a “natural delineation of human passions, human characters, and human incidents” uses “language of conversation in the middle and lower classes of society” instead of “gaudiness and inane phraseology” of much contemporary poetry advocates incorporation of democratic principles into poetic practice
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Major Concepts for the New Poetry Scenes to be taken from common life with a colouring of imagination thrown over them Language of men—no different from the language of prose Spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling, recollected in tranquility Poetry inspired by nature brings pleasure in acknowledgment of the beauty of the universe
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New Definition of a Poet A poet is a “man speaking to men” but with heightened sensibility; not different in kind but in degree Portrait: Benjamin Robert Hayden, 1818
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“The Wordsworthian or Egotistical Sublime” Twenty years after Lyrical Ballads, John Keats redefined the poet again: “A Poet…has no Identity—he is continually in for—and filling some other Body” (letter, 1818); According to Keats, Wordsworth is all identity, enamored with himself. For Lord Byron, Wordsworth is simply dull: “Wordsworth sometimes wakes, To show with what complacency he creeps” ( Don Juan, Canto 3, lines 874-5; 1821) Portrait: Benyamin Robert Hayden, 1842
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Formal Experimentation: Lyrical Ballads Lyric : a type or genre - of poem that expresses a state of mind, feeling, mood, or thought
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