Paper #1 - 1 Matt Breitung Dr. Doug Evans HUM 2210 9 July...

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1 Matt Breitung Dr. Doug Evans HUM 2210 9 July 2009 Paper #1: The Stele of Hammurabi and Code of Moses The ways humans viewed and responded to laws have changed over the years. One facet that pushed laws and rules into being valid and practiced is the way they were recorded. One of the first recorded bodies of law was consolidated by Babylon’s sixth ruler, Hammurabi. Another significant recorded figure of law during that period is the Code of Moses, also known as the Torah. Both of these figures solidified the law or religion of the period. Even though they came from different regions, they both had many similarities. The Stele of Hammurabi stands at 7 feet tall and was placed in the middle of the city for all to see. The actual code contained 282 laws that all were expected to follow and be responsible for. These laws were all extremely straightforward, generally in the form of “If you do ‘x’, your punishment will be ‘y’”. This was intended for the use of maintaining order in Babylon. This written law protected the people from confusion of depending on the leader’s decisions. Unwritten law can be easily forgotten or changed because of the memory of whoever is
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This note was uploaded on 07/12/2009 for the course HUM 2210 taught by Professor Evans during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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Paper #1 - 1 Matt Breitung Dr. Doug Evans HUM 2210 9 July...

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