ws 38 - S YLLABUS MEEN 221 - Section 300 Summer 2009...

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Unformatted text preview: S YLLABUS MEEN 221 - Section 300 Summer 2009 Statics and Particle Dynamics i3 .vthmm ......................... .m ............... cm mmmmmm a... AM;ir.2i.!_,.%339.EM‘iZACH1043 a l if Vii—l. E! e: 221. Statics and Particle Dynamics. (2-2). Credit 3. Application of the fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics to the statics and dynamics of particles; equilibrium of trusses, frames, beams and other rigid bodies. Prerequisites: Admission to upper division in an engineering major; MATH 251 or 253 or registration therein; PHYS 218. Professor: Dr. Alan B. Palazzolo Office: 125 ENGlPHY BLD. 845-5280 a-palazzolo@tamu.edu Office Hours : 10:00 — 10:30 M & F, and 3:00 — 3:30 W, or by appt. EXAM #1 Wednesday June 24 6-8 PM EXAM #2 Wednesday July 22 6-8 PM FINAL EXAM Tuesday August 11 10:30 am—12:30 pm ZACH 104b 90-100 Grading Breakdown A = B = 30-89 Exam #1 25% c = 70—79 Exam #2 25% D = 60—69 Final Exam 25% F = 0-59 Homework 10% Quizzes ‘ 15% HOMEWORK : Work Neatly to submit an easily grade-able document . Box all answers. Submit figures and Tables where appropriate . Each student must submit his or her homework solution . Late HW will be penalized . Please submit printout of computer code if problem requires computer code solution Solutions will be posted on WEBCT REQUIRED TEXTS: 1) Engineering Mechanics: STATICS, 2nd Edition, William F. Riley and Leroy D. Sturges, John Wiley & Sons: New York. 2) Engineering Mechanics: DYNAMICS, 2'1d Edition, William F. Riley and Leroy D. Sturges John Wiley & Sons: New York. Books On Reserve at 2nd Floor of Evans Library (See Reserves Desk - MEEN 221) Anthor: Meriam3 ,l. L. games L.! Request ID(s) #3145. Title: Engineering mechanics Edition: 6th ed. Pub.: New York : J. Wiley, 2007 Auth: Meriam, ,l. L. {James L.) TA350 .M458 2003 v.1 Request ID(s) #3146 Title: Engineering mechanics. Vol. 1, Statics / J .L. Meriam and LG. Kraige ; with special contributions by William J. Palm, III. EdltITSth ed., SI version. Authr‘f Bedford A. W Request ID(s) #3148. Title: Engineering mechanics : statics and dynamics/ Anthony Bedford, Wallace Fowler. Ed": 4th ed. AuthOBedrord A. TA352 .B382 2005 Request ID(s) “ #3147 Title: Engineering mechanics : dynamics / Anthony Bedford, Wallace Fowler. Ed‘tgfmh ed. IN CLASS COMPUTERS (Laptops) : Please turn off for the entire duration of every class Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Policy Statement The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact the Department of Student Life, Services for Students with Disabilities, in Room 126 of the Koldus Building or call 845 -1637. Academic Integrity Statement Aggie Honor Code: "An Aggie does not lie, cheat, or steal, or tolerate those who do. " It is the responsibility of students and instructors to help maintain scholastic integrity at the university by refusing to participate in or tolerate scholastic dishonesty (Student Rule 20. Scholastic Dishonesty, http:/[student- rules.tamu.edu). New procedures and policies have been adopted effective September 1, 2004. Details are available through the Office of the Aggie Honor System (htt : WWW.tamu.edu a iehonor . An excerpt from the Philosophy & Rationale section states: "Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of academic dishonesty is not a neutral act -- failure to confront and deter it will reinforce, perpetuate, and enlarge the scope of such misconduct. Academic dishonesty is the most corrosive force in the academic life of a university." 16 (5) 18 (6) 23 7 24 25 (8) 30 9 Jul 2 3 7 9 22 23 15 28 (16) August 11 * for instructor use only Tue , Equivalent Force Systems Course Calendar S stems Centroids, Distributed Force Systems Equilibrium for 2D Models E uilibrium for 3D Models EXAM I 6:00-8:00PM Truss Force Analysis by Joints and Sections 3D Trusses N O CLASSES UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY Forces in Frames and Machines Internal Forces and Moments and Shear and Moment Diag ams Static Friction Area Moment of Inertia Last day for all students to drop Kinematics —— Straight Line Motion EXAM II 6:00-8:00 PM Kinematics — Curvilinear Motion Curvilinear Motion, Rigid Rotation Rectilinear Kinetics Curvilinear Kinetics Kinetics of Ri 'd Bodies — Newton FINAL EXAM- ZACH 104b 10:30 am —12:30 m **Due 2nd class after exam 4.6.1 5.1 —5.6 6.4 7.1 — 7.4 ‘6 GE ‘6 65 ‘6 6‘ CC 6‘ 10.1 — 10.2.4 13.5 13.5,14.1~_14.4 15.1 - 15.3 _—_,__§—_———__,—T—,—__ Date Day Lecture Subject Book Homework Ref.* Sections Assignment, Due Next Class _ June 2 (1) Units, Gravity, Transmissibility, 1.1 — 1.7, Ch 1 (1,8,21,48) T Concurrent Forces, Force Anal sis 2.1,2,2,2.4, 2.5 Ch 2 (1,13, 3037) 1,2 4 (2) Th Force Resultants, Static Equilibrium, Free 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, Ch 2 (58, 84) 3,4 Bod Dia ams 323.3, 6.2 Ch 3 (3,8,10,23,37) 9 (3) T Moments, Equivalent Force—Moment 4.1,4.2,4.3 Ch 4 (2,8,12,24,28 5,6 55,59) Ch 4(113,125,122, 125, 153,159 Ch 5 (2,11,14,29, 39, 89,107 Ch 6 (35,37,43,60,62,86) Ch 6 (83,87,89,90)** Ch 7 (7,9,16,43,59,68) Ch 7 (74,79,77) Ch 7 (83,88,101,114,121) Ch 8 (6,15,36,40,55) Ch 9 (3,5,25,30,94) Ch 10 (4,11,18,33,37) courses with no penalty for the 10- week semester (Q-drog), 5 em. 21 (14) T 13.1 — 13.4 Ch 13 20 1,23,27,39,69,71 ** 16.1 —16.4.3 Ch 15 (51,65,104,113) Ch 16 (34,38,42,68) *** Due at Final Exam Ch 13 (105,108,111,112) 21 Ch 13 (122,124,127) 22 Ch 14 3,4,19 Ch 15 (2,5,8,18,32) 23 12,13 14 EXITING SKILLS EXPECTED FROM MEEN 221 THAT FOCUSSES ON AN INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING MECHANICS Students that have taken this course will demonstrate that they have mastered the following information and skills related to the statics and dynamics of particles and the statics of rigid bodies. Specifically they will: 1. 10. 11. 12. 13. Have the ability to easily work with the Standard American and SI units and be able to move comfortably between in-lb-sec, ft-lb-sec, m-kg-sec, and mm-kg-sec systems of units. Also understand the difference between mass and weight and the critical need for dimensional consistency in all equations that are developed to model engineering systems. Understand the importance and possess the ability to easily work with of free body diagrams and know how to construct them for particles, systems of particles, and structural trusses and frames. Be able to develop and apply equilibrium relationships for non-accelerating particles acted upon by external forces and moments. Understand the definitions and characteristics of moments and couples and be able to compute moments and represent them as vectors. Understand the definitions and be able to work with equivalent force-couple systems. Understand the fundamental definitions and be able to compute the of center of mass, the center of gravity, and the centroids as applied to volumes, areas, and lines and specific techniques for evaluating these properties for composite bodies. Be able to compute the area moments of inertia. Be able to use the principles of centroids to calculate equivalent resultants for distributed loads including hydrostatic pressures. Recognize and use the common representations of various idealized support conditions for two and three dimensional rigid bodies. Be able to develop equilibrium relationships for non—accelerating two and three dimensional rigid bodies acted upon by external forces. Also understand the significance of and need for external reactions. Be able to apply equilibrium relationships to calculate the internal forces in individual members of two and three dimensional trusses. Be able to apply equilibrium relationships to calculate the forces and couples acting on the individual members that make up two-dimensional frames and machines. Be able to calculate internal forces (axial, shear, and moment) in multi-force, two- dimensional structural members and recognize why these internal forces exist. Also appreciate that these internal forces can vary with position along a member. Understand the origins and the definitions of static and dynamic Coulomb friction forces and be able to model them correctly when developing equations of equilibrium or equations of motion. Also recognize the inter-relationship between the forces acting normal to a plane of contact and the forces that exist in the plane of contact. Additionally, recognize when and how the magnitude and direction of frictional forces can change and understand how to apply equilibrium relationships to various non- accelerating rigid bodies experiencing friction (including wedges, inclined planes, and flat belts). 14. 15. 16. 17. Understand and be able to apply the two-dimensional (planar) definitions for velocity and acceleration for Cartesian, polar, and path coordinates. Know and understand how to use coordinate transformations to start from a definition of velocity and acceleration components in one coordinate system and develop the corresponding component definitions in another coordinate system. Also understand the inter-relationships between position, velocity, and acceleration. Understand Newton’s Laws of motion for a particle. Be able to draw free-body diagrams and develop the equations of motions for particles in Cartesian, polar, and path coordinate systems. Also appreciate that they are developing differential equations of motion, even though they may not have the capability of solving these equations. Be able to use the work—energy equation Work “I = A( T + V ) is the first integral (with respect to displacement) of Newton’s Second Law of motion for a particle. Understand the significance of a potential force and understand when and how to apply the potential energy functions for a linear spring and gravity. Understand Coulomb-friction and be able to calculate the work done by Coulomb-friction forces. Understand work done by an external force and be able to calculate the work done by external forces acting on a particle. Be able to apply the general work- energy equation. Permission to Distribute Graded Papers to Class Members By my signature below, I grant permission to Dr. Palazzolo to distribute my graded papers { items such as homework papers, reports, quizzes, major exams, etc. } in MEEN 289 section 504 in any of the following ways: I Placing papers in a prescribed location in the classroom or near the professor's office for students to pick up personally I Passing out papers to the class in a single bundle or stack that is passed from student to student for each student to retrieve his/her own paper ' {others as folks may deem appropriate ?} I fully understand that these methods may make it possible for others to see the grades on such papers or materials but am hereby waiving my right to privacy in these instances. _ Texas A&M University -- College Of Engineering MEEN 221 — Section 504 Fall 2006 Student Questionnaire NAME: E-mail Address: Phone: MIOR CODE: OVERALL GPA: / 4.0 CREDIT HOURS COMPLETED AT TAMU: OTHER CLASSES THIS SEMESTER: ENGR 221 AND PRE-[CO-RES QUISITES: ENGR 112: When: Grade: Instructor: PHYS 218: When: Grade: Instructor: MATH 152: When: Grade: Instructor: MATH 251: When: Grade: Instructor: Rate your UNDERSTANDING of the fundamentals of mechanics (as ogposed to an abilng to use (annulus): Excellent Good Fair Poor ANY SPECIAL CONCERNS or COMMENTS: ...
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ws 38 - S YLLABUS MEEN 221 - Section 300 Summer 2009...

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