p151_ch5_self_post

p151_ch5_self_post - 1 Psychology 151 Chapter 4 Social...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 Psychology 151 4/13/2009 Chapter 4: Social Chapter 4: Social Chapter 4: Social Chapter 4: Social Perception Wrap Perception Wrap Perception Wrap Perception Wrap-up up up up Chapter 5: The Self Chapter 5: The Self Chapter 5: The Self Chapter 5: The Self Why does type of attribution matter? • Affects people’s response to the behavior – Emotion – Judgment – Behavior Viewing the Social World: The Self Esteem Approach vs. The Social Cognition Approach The need to feel good about ourselves • Motivated to see ourselves and those we care about in a positive light The need to see the world accurately • Accuracy for predicting and controlling • Gaining rewards, avoiding punishments The Self-Esteem Approach: The Need to Feel Good about Ourselves • Most people need to maintain reasonably high self-esteem – Acknowledging major deficiencies in ourselves is very difficult Self-Esteem People’s evaluations of their own self-worth; the extent to which they view themselves as good, competent, and decent. Source of image: Microsoft Of ice Online. Who am I? • Physical • Social (relationships, memberships, roles) • Psychological (traits, states, attitudes) • Holistic Chapter 5: THE SELF Who are you? How did you come to be this person you call “myself”? Self-concept – thoughts & beliefs about who we are Self-awareness – act of thinking about ourselves Source of image: Microsoft Of ice Online. 2 THE SELF • Chimps & orangutans, and possibly dolphins, have a self-concept • Age 2 • As we grow older, self- concept becomes more complex Source of image: Microsoft Of ice Online. Gallup (1977): Do chimps have a self-concept? 2 groups of chimps • One in isolation, one in social environment • Place chimps in cages with mirrors • Collect baseline measure of touching forehead • Anesthetize chimps and put red dot on forehead • Return to cages and count forehead touches Results • Baseline-- social and asocial chimps touch foreheads the same amount • Red Dot-- social chimps touch foreheads more • Evidence that they “know” that the reflection in the mirror is them -- socialization is important...
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p151_ch5_self_post - 1 Psychology 151 Chapter 4 Social...

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