wk5a - Seth R. Norton POL2241 Brown 1. Define the following...

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Seth R. Norton POL2241 Brown 1. Define the following terms: 527 organizations- Organizations that under section 527 of the Internal revenue Code, Raises and spends money to advance political causes. blanket primary- A primary election in which each voter may vote for candidates from both parties. closed primary- A primary election in which voting is limited to already registered party members. Coattails- The alleged tendency of candidates to win more votes in an election because of a presence at the top of the ticket of a better known candidate general election- An election held to chose which candidate will hold office. Gerrymandering- Drawing the boundaries of legislative districts in bizarre or unusual shapes to favor one party Incumbent- The person already holding an elective office. independent expenditures- Spending by political action committees, corporations or labor unions that is done to help a party or candidate but is done independently of them. Malapportionment- Drawing the boundaries of legislative districts so that they are unequal in population open primary- A primary election in which voters may choose in which party to vote as they enter the polling place. political action committee- A committee set up by a corporation, labor union, or interest groups that raises and spends campaign money from donations. position issue- An issue about which the public is divided and rival candidates or political parties adopt different policy positions. primary election- An election in which voters may choose a candidate for office. prospective voting- Voting for a candidate because you favor his or her ideas for handling issues retrospective voting- Voting for a candidates because you like his or her past actions in office. runoff primary- A secondary held when no candidate wins a majority of the votes in the first primary. soft money- Funds obtained by political parties that are spent on party activities, such as
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get-out-and-vote drives, but not on behalf of a specific candidate. sophomore surge- An increase in votes congressional candidates usually get when they first run for election. valence issue- An issue about which the public is united and rival candidates or political parties adopt similar positions in hopes that each will be thought to best represent those widely shared beliefs. 2. In today’s media-intensive style of campaigning, candidates must learn how to condense their policy ideas into thirty-second, or even fifteen-second, sound bites in order to get their message through to viewers and listeners. What are the possible implications that this raises for the candidates’ campaign? Do candidates need to formulate detailed positions on complicated issues before getting elected, or will a short explanation suffice? How does the use of sound bite explanations affect our expectations for candidates once elected? Are all policy issues explainable in thirty seconds or less? The implications are they may not be able to get everything they need to say about the issue
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This note was uploaded on 07/18/2009 for the course POL 2241 taught by Professor Brown during the Summer '08 term at Troy.

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wk5a - Seth R. Norton POL2241 Brown 1. Define the following...

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