Biomaterials07_BiomaterialsII

Biomaterials07_Bioma - EBME 105 Biomaterials Pins Screws Bone Plates Hip Joints and Knee Joints Christopher J Hernandez Glennan 615A(216-368-6441

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Christopher J. Hernandez Christopher J. Hernandez Glennan 615A Glennan 615A (216)-368-6441 (216)-368-6441 [email protected] [email protected] edu edu EBME 105: EBME 105: Biomaterials Biomaterials November 14, 2007 November 14, 2007 Orthopedic Orthopedic Biomaterials Biomaterials Pins, Screws, Bone Plates, Hip Joints, and Knee Joints
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a non-living substance used in a medical device, intended to interact with biological systems OR a synthetic or natural substance (other than food or drug), which can be used in a device to treat, augment or replace a tissue, organ or function of the body. Historically, biomaterials development was driven by clinicians. Biomaterials are systematically designed and developed to satisfy specific physical properties. The biocompatibilities of such materials are extensively characterized . Most biomaterials are developed as “inert” materials. Future biomaterials are intended to “interact” and “participate” the biological systems: TISSUE ENGINEERING. What are Biomaterials? EBME 306 EBME 315 EBME 325
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Orthopaedic Biomaterials for Fracture Fixation Orthopaedics -> Biomechanical Role is Important Goals of Fracture Fixation Close the fracture (Mechanical) Limit motion to facilitate healing (Biological) EMAE 415 Edinburgh University
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1886: Hansmann developed Ni-plated steel bone fracture plate. Early 1900s: Sherman used vanadium alloy steel (tough, ductile). 1924: Zierold used Co-Cr alloy (Stellite), the most inert material. 1924-1930: 18-8 (18%Cr, 8% Ni) and 18-8s Mo (2-4% Mo) were introduced for better corrosion resistance. Current: 316 SS, CoCr alloy, Ti alloy and polymer materials.
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Biomaterials07_Bioma - EBME 105 Biomaterials Pins Screws Bone Plates Hip Joints and Knee Joints Christopher J Hernandez Glennan 615A(216-368-6441

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