section4 - Section 4 18:51 Neurons & Glia The Neuron o...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Section 4 18:51 The Neuron o What is a neuron? of electrochemical signals Supported by their administrative assistants – the glial cells  (glue  holding nervous system together) Parts of the Neuron Soma Dendrites o Branch like fibers that carry neural impulses to the cell body Axon o Carries impulses away from cell body to other neurons o 1 axon per neuron Myelin o Protective coating that surrounds axon; speeds transmission of message o If you don’t have it, you get multiple sclerosis  Terminal buttons o Small nodules at end of axon that release chemicals to other neurons Three types of neurons Sensory neurons o Relay sensory information to the brain
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Motor neurons o Responsible for motor functions o Located in spinal cord Interneuron o Receive sensory info from sensory neurons and sends motor info to other  interneuron’s and motor neurons Types of Glia Microglia o Brain’s immune system o Keeps invaders out o Activated in response to injury or disease Astrocytes o Synchronize neuronal activity o Divide in response to injury or disease o Remove wastes – pick up excess neurotransmitters Schwann cells o Myelinate the peripheral nervous system o Wraps itself around the axon Oligodendrocytes o Myelinate the central nervous system How neurons communicate All about neural impulses – the signal that is sent form one neuron to another
Background image of page 2
Step 1: a neuron at its resting potential o Polarize – carries an electrical charge o Resting membrane potential (-70 mV) o Na+ (sodium) outside the membrane o K+ inside the membrane Less positive charge than outside Step 3: the neuron decides whether or not to fire o The cell adds up the voltage of all the messages o If the voltage in the cell rises to -55mV or high, the cell fires o The principle of “all or nothing” Step 4: the neuron fires/creates an action potential o The cell becomes more positive by opening up its na+ channels o To compensate and try to become more negative, the cell opens up its K+  channels to let those positive ions out o When it becomes ngative again, the K+ channels close o The action potential travels down the neuron, ending up in the terminal  buttons Step 5: neurotransmitters are released o Once the charges gets to the terminal button, it causes Na+ channels to  open o When NA+ enters the cells, it makes the vesicles merge with the  membrane and burst These vesicles contain neurotransmitters o When the vesicles burst, the neurotransmitters are released in the  synaptic cleft Step 6: the postsynaptic neuron gets the message
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/19/2009 for the course PSYC 107 taught by Professor Hull during the Spring '07 term at Texas A&M.

Page1 / 15

section4 - Section 4 18:51 Neurons & Glia The Neuron o...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online