Results-Williamson - potential products are even higher...

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Results: We began our experiment with 2.029 grams of potassium hydroxide and 1.003 grams of Cresol. We were unable to maintain a continuous boil but as we added the chloroacetic acid drop wise, it began to boil more. Once we removed the mixture from the heat, the mixture began to crystallize. When we performed our final filtration, we collected 0.548 grams of white crystals, which led to a 35.6 percent yield. The melting point of this product was 73-80 ºC. Conclusion: Our percent yield was slightly low. This could have been caused by adding too much chloroacetic acid at one time. Our melting point results concluded that our product is m-methylphenoxyacetic acid, although, it is an almost 23 degree difference. The other
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Unformatted text preview: potential products are even higher than the m- methylphenoxyacetic acid. This low melting point may have resulted from not being able to adequately dry our final product. Questions: Synthesis for t-butyl methyl ether and n-butyl phenyl ether 2. Yes. This will cause the product, as well as the unreacted phenol, to be in the same layer, rather than separated. The use of K2CO3 will cause the phenol to not be present in the extract. 3. If the isomer dissolves in the aqueous NaOH, it is the A isomer. If the isomer does not dissolve in the aqueous NaOH, it is the B isomer....
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This note was uploaded on 07/19/2009 for the course CHEM 234-54 taught by Professor Morrison during the Spring '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Results-Williamson - potential products are even higher...

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