PPE07_Flux - Electric Fields Flux RHJansen Electric Field...

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Electric Fields Electric Fields Flux Flux © RHJansen
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Electric Field Density When we draw electric field lines the strength of the electric field is evident by the closeness of the lines. Where the lines are closest the field is strongest. If the lines are parallel the field is uniform (equally strong at all locations). A strong electric field will have more electric field lines passing through an area of space. In order to standardize electric field comparisons (apples to apples) we need to use the same area every time we test any electric field’s strength. The SI unit of area is square meters © RHJansen
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Electric Field Density of Point Charges Where is the field the strongest in these scenarios ? + 1 2 3 4 Area 3. © RHJansen
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Electric Field Density of Charged Plates Where is the field the strongest in these scenarios ? 4 Same everywhere. Conceptually you can think of electric field density as the number of field lines passing through an area of space. + + + + + + 1 2 3 © RHJansen
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Counting Field Lines ? But, how do you count field lines. Look around you, do you see gravity field lines pointing down? Field lines do not really exist. Field lines are a manmade construct to make an invisible property of gravity and electricity easier to visualize. © RHJansen
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Find Something Proportional to Field Lines. How then do we measure the field lines per area ? The line density (lines per area) is proportional to the electric field strength. The stronger the field the more lines in the same area. Multiplying the electric field E by the area A gives us EA . EA is not the number of lines, but it is proportional to line density. Basically it gives up an idea of how much electric field is flowing through that area.
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This note was uploaded on 07/21/2009 for the course PHYSICS 7B taught by Professor Packard during the Spring '08 term at Berkeley.

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PPE07_Flux - Electric Fields Flux RHJansen Electric Field...

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