PPE14_PotentialPointChg - Potential Electric Potential of...

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Potential Potential Electric Potential of Electric Potential of Point Charges Point Charges © RHJansen
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Potential © RHJansen The equation for potential depends on the configuration of the charged object . In this course there are two important charge configurations. In the last presentation we discussed charged plates + + + + d E = ς δ V = Εδ If rearranged This equation finds the potential difference between two charged plates separated by a distance d . V = 1 4πε 0 Σ θ ι ρ V = κ Simplifies to q Now we will look at point charges / spheres P r This equation finds the potential due to a point charge q at a point P located r meters away from q .
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Potential Of Point Charges © RHJansen For the remainder of this presentation we will focus on point charges. The next presentation will discuss charged plates. Let’s rearrange the last picture a bit to continue comparing to gravity. r q 1 P P r m 1 Charge q 1 generates an electric potential (voltage) at point P . This electric pressure does nothing unless something is placed at point P that will feel this pressure. We have not learned an equation for gravity pressure, so we have no gravity equivalent to electric potential. V 1 = κ θ 1 ρ Now we will add a object at point P and see how potential effects it.
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r Potential Of Point Charges © RHJansen q 1 P r m 1 P m 2 q 2 The potential (pressure) from q 1 Exerts a pressure on q 2 . The pressure from q 1 is associated with the systems energy. m 2 has height and is capable of moving . Therefore, the system has potential energy of gravity. V 1 = κΣ θ 1 ρ U E = 2 ς 1 U E = 2 κ 1 U E = κ 1 2 U g = Γ μ 1 2
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Potential and Potential Energy © RHJansen There are many ways to say Potential Potential Electric Potential Potential Difference The change in potential Δ V = V V 0 Voltage Electromotive Force , emf ( ε ) Used in batteries and generators There are many ways to say Energy Potential Energy Electric Potential Energy Work The change in potential energy W = Δ U E = U E U E 0 Several of these terms contained the word potential. How can you tell when I am asking for V or U E ? When the phrase contains the word energy, then the problem is looking for U E .
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Potential Is Not a Vector Electric field is a vector and requires Finding direction, drawing vectors, and using vector addition.
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This note was uploaded on 07/21/2009 for the course PHYSICS 7B taught by Professor Packard during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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PPE14_PotentialPointChg - Potential Electric Potential of...

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