101_presidency_tonerfriendly

101_presidency_tonerfriendly - The Presidency Introduction...

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The Presidency
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Introduction • For the next few weeks, we will focus on the institutions or branches of government. – We can think of these branches as working together to form our government. • But, we also need to recall that each branch has its own agenda and interests. • They are interlocked in a power game. • Each branch tries to gain power and prestige at the expense of the others. • For the lighter side of this introduction, watch this: Three ring circus
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Introduction • As the clip shows, there are 3 formal branches of our government. – We will be adding the bureaucracy into this mix and look at it separately. • We begin today with the Executive Branch—The Presidency. • Created by Article II of the Constitution – But this article only offers an outline of the powers of the presidency and how it should run.
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Introduction • Its interesting, but when folks refer to the presidency, they often equate it with the President. – In other words, the executive branch is often viewed as single person making all the decisions and wielding all the power. • After all, that was the compromise in 1787—a single executive… • Clearly, the presidency is more than 1 person – There are a large number of employees & agencies working to execute the law. • These individuals and agencies influence the President and act in his name.
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Introduction • It is easier to split these folks into 2 main categories: – Bureaucracy • The group of agencies created by congressional legislation to perform tasks and functions related to policy in specific areas. • The cabinet departments are the most visible agencies. – Do agencies always follow the President’s wishes??
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Introduction • It is easier to split these folks into 2 main categories: – Executive Office of the President • These are the people that work more directly with the President to carry-out his agenda, and make his administration successful. • We can divide these folks into two more categories – White House Office – Staff Agencies
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Introduction • White House Office – Consists of people normally referred to as White House Staff. • i.e. Press Secretary or Chief of Staff • These are the folks that work in the West Wing. – During the first G.W. Bush administration, a Washington Post reporter provided us with this insight into the WHO—those with offices closest to the Oval, or with better views, tend to have more power.
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• Offices 1 & 2 are for the President’s personnel • VP Cheney has office 8, Andy Card (Chief of Staff) has office 12, Scott McClellan (Press Secretary) is in 3, and then NSC Secretary Condelezza Rice had office 7. – All of these offices are large with good views.
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This note was uploaded on 07/22/2009 for the course GOV 312L taught by Professor Madrid during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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101_presidency_tonerfriendly - The Presidency Introduction...

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