Discussion 01-21

Discussion 01-21 - ETX 20 Discussion 01/21 Brittany...

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ETX 20  Discussion 01/21 Brittany Huntington bcrowland@ucdavis.edu Office Hours: By appointment Or contact via SmartSite chat room
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Outline Deadline Reminders Lecture Review (Crime Scenes, Chemical  Analysis, and Poisons)  Practical Exercises  Question: What would you like me to  cover in these discussion sections?
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Term Paper Timelines January 30 - Choice of topic and outline (15 points) February 27 - Final version due: 1000 – 1200 words (85 points) Late submissions marked down 10% per day Term papers and outlines will be uploaded directly to the SmartSite Drop  Box Term papers must have a bibliography citing at least 3 reputable sources supporting the main arguments.  Best examples of “reputable sources”: Peer reviewed publications Books by authorities with acknowledged expertise.
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     Assignments Five exercises (4 points each) to be provided at appropriate times during the course Blood spatter – Due TOMORROW, 01/22 Ballistics matching – Due 02/06 DNA – Profile Frequency – Due 02/19   Anthropology measurements – Due 03/03 DNA – Paternity testing – Due 03/12 Special instructions and background during Discussion sessions TA – Brittany Huntington (bcrowland@ucdavis.edu) Office hours: SmartSite chat room, or by appointment
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Crime Scenes Good forensic technique and analysis is  important Garbage in- Garbage out it is difficult to create a good result when given  bad input you must reconstruct a crime scene using  only the good information, and realizing what  isn’t pertinent
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Why Search Crime Scenes? Find out what exactly happened  Reconstruction—what is the crime (if any)? Focus on evidence left behind/removed Can we identify who did it? Can we determine when? Where? Why? Provide investigative leads? Gang related? Husband-wife?  Corroborate suspect, witness, and victim  stories Present evidence in court
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Evidence Classes Conclusive The suspect can be identified Circumstantial Shows association between the criminal and  the event Interpretive Fits more than 1 story
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Upon Arrival Keep in mind crime scenes are always  CONTAMINATED!  Make sure the scene is safe Know who was there before you Paramedics, police, who found the scene Get reference shoe prints Prevent losing evidence Follow ambulance to hospital
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Stabilizing the Scene Protect evidence from being destroyed Weather, heat (Biologicals), traffic, time  (GSR and Alcohol in body)  Keep unnecessary people out Media, witnesses, victims, suspects, etc Isolate participants Don’t want witnesses or suspects to talk to  each other Security is run by law enforcement
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Discussion 01-21 - ETX 20 Discussion 01/21 Brittany...

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