Discussion 01-28

Discussion 01-28 - ETX 20 Discussion 01/28 Brittany...

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ETX 20  Discussion 01/28 Brittany Huntington bcrowland@ucdavis.edu Office Hours: By appointment Contact through SmartSite chat room
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Outline Questions? Reminders Lecture Review Personal Identification Alcohol and Drugs of Abuse Clandestine Meth Labs
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REMINDERS Your term paper outline is due this Friday,  January 30 th , by 5pm The Midterm is on February 10 th Next Wednesday I will be holding a review  during discussion
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Personal Identification
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Personal Identification Forensic Odontology Definition: bite mark is a patterned injury of  the skin produced by teeth Uses of dentistry in Identification Identification of unknown by their teeth Suspects Suspects teeth compared to bite mark on victim Decedents Victims teeth compared to proposed victim’s dental  records Bite mark investigations Personal abuse Sexual assault
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History of Forensic Odontology 1453- first formally reported dental ID 1692- first bite mark case in a criminal trial  (witchcraft) 1776- first dental ID by a dental professional 1849- first dental evidence admitted into a US court 1878- first mass disaster in which dental ID was  used 1952- first US bite mark case resulting in a  conviction 1990’s- organized forensic dentistry develops and  formalizes guidelines and standards for  identification, bite mark management, and mass  disasters
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Situations for Identification using Teeth Skeletonized remains Decomposing remains Charred remains Mutilated remains
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Variations in teeth allow ID Fillings Fractures Abrasions Erosions Implants Stains Restorations Dentures Impacted, missing teeth Periodontal disease Development anomalies  For there to be an identification there MUST be  a known reference to compare to! 
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Types of Identifications from Teeth Positive Identification Data matches in sufficient detail with NO  unexplainable discrepancies Possible Identification Data is consistent but because of quality a positive  match cannot be established Insufficient evidence Not enough data present to form a conclusion Exclusion Data is clearly inconsistent
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Collecting bite mark evidence- Victim Swab to recover saliva (DNA) Photographs Long range Midrange Close up With and without scale markers Make impressions/casts Remove tissue (if appropriate) Make impressions, casts of victim’s bite mark 
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Collecting bite mark evidence- Suspect Make impression, cast of teeth Obtain dental records and perform  examination Compare to victim Obtain saliva samples Compare to bite marks on victim Judge likelihood of match
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This note was uploaded on 07/22/2009 for the course ETX 001 taught by Professor Matthewwood during the Winter '09 term at UC Davis.

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Discussion 01-28 - ETX 20 Discussion 01/28 Brittany...

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