Ch_322a_2.01

Ch_322a_2.01 - Chapter 2 Representative Carbon Compounds...

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Representative Carbon Compounds Chapter 2 Intermolecular Forces and Infrared Spectroscopy The ability of carbon to form covalent bonds to other carbon atoms, as well as atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and others, leads to an enormous variety of structures. Many of these are found in biological systems.
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Hydrocarbons Hydrocarbons contain only hydrogen and carbon. Examples are methane ( CH 4 ) and ethane ( C 2 H 6 ) which are called saturated hydrocarbons because the structures have the maximum number of hydrogens for the number of carbons present. Ethene ( C 2 H 4 ) and ethyne ( C 2 H 2 ) are unsaturated hydrocarbons because they do not have the maximum number of hydrogens for the number of carbons in the structures. Aromatics are another class of cyclic hydrocarbons with special electronic and chemical properties.
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Methane This first member of the alkane family is the major component in natural gas (60-80%) found in geological deposits. A large industry is based on the recovery and distribution of natural gas
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This note was uploaded on 07/22/2009 for the course CHEM 322AL taught by Professor Jung during the Summer '07 term at USC.

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Ch_322a_2.01 - Chapter 2 Representative Carbon Compounds...

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