Fast Plants.pdf - Investigating Mendelian Genetics with...

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Investigating Mendelian Genetics with Wisconsin Fast Plants Amanda Zamot & Diana Valle BIO 202L DDF Dr. Janet Rollins Experiment: September 6, 2019, November 8, 2019 & November 15, 2019 Report: December 6, 2019
Abstract: (Amanda Zamot) The purpose of the experiment is to explore mendel’s law of segregation and his law of independent assortment. We used wisconsin fast plants, which grow fast enough to observe P ,/P , F and F generations in one semester. By beginning with wildtype parentals such as mendel had, we are able to observe ideal phenotypic ratios in both the first and second generations. Introduction: (Amanda Zamot) Gregor Mendel was a 19th century monk who is known today as the father of genetics. Through his experiments on pea plants, he was able to yield two important principles of genetics: The Law of Segregation and the Law of Independent Assortment. The law of segregation states that a pair of alleles separate during gamete formation and the law of independent assortment states alleles separate independently of one another. The genotype of a trait contains two alleles, one from each parent. The physical expression the genotypes assert is considered the phenotype. Alleles can either be dominant or recessive, and a genotype can either be heterozygous, consisting of both dominant or recessive alleles, or homozygous, consisting of only dominant or recessive alleles. In order for a recessive trait can be expressed phenotypically, the genotype must be homozygous recessive.

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