Notes - 18:58 Data The basis of statistical analysis Can be...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
18:58 Data The basis of statistical analysis Can be number, record names, or other labels Not all represented by numbers are numerical data (e.g. 1=male, 2=female) Useless w/o their context Statistic Numerical summary of data You can’t be a statistic, only a datum Data Tables Name  (who) P r i c e Etc.  (what) Eric . 0 1 Houston Aaron . 0 5 Texas City The “W’s” Who and What are essential o Who Tells us individual cases about which (or whom) we have collected data Individual whoa answer a survey are called subjects or participants Animals, plants, and inanimate objects are called experimental units What and Why (and in what units)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
o Categorical (or qualitive) You can categorize variables (Y or N) o Quantitative Can take any value on  a wide range (price) (units) When Where How Counts When we count the cases inn each category of a categorical variable, the  counts are not the data, but something we summarize the data. Identifying Identifiers They are categorical var. w/ exactly one ind. in each category Sample Cases selected from larger population Samples are the who of the 5 W’s. Population Entire grouo  Stem-and-Leaf Displays Show the distribution of a quantitative variable, like histograms do, while  preserving the individual values. Age C o u n t Stem   1|8  leaf 7 Stem   1|9  leaf 6 Stem   2|0  leaf 2
Background image of page 2
Stem   2|1  leaf 4 o Stem o 1           8888888999999 o 2           001111 Histograms: Earthquake Magnitudes First, slice up the entire span of values covered by the quantitative variable  into equal-width piles called bins. The bins and the counts in each bin give the distribution of the quantitative  variable. A histogram plots the bin counts as the heights of bars (like a bar chart). A relative frequency histogram displays the percentage of cases in each bin  instead of the count. o In this way, relative frequency hist. are faithful to the area principle Dgsgf Shape, Center, and Spread When describing a distribution, make sure to always tell about these three  things
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is the shape of the Distribution? Does the hist. have a single, central hump or several separated humps? o Humps in a hist. are called modes o A hist. with one main peak is dubbed unimodal; his with two peaks are  bimodal; his with 3 or more peaks are called multimodal o A hist that doesn’t appear to have any mode in which all the bars are  approximately the same height is called uniform Is the hist. symmetric? o
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 13

Notes - 18:58 Data The basis of statistical analysis Can be...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online