29 BIO 326R Dendritic Cells

29 BIO 326R Dendritic Cells - BIO 326R Dendritic cells and...

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BIO 326R Dendritic cells and Immune organs
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Dendritic Cells First discovered in late 1868, but only recognized as immunes cells in the ’70s. Perhaps underappreciated until last ~10 years Originate in bone marrow, mostly from myeloid lineage (probably from monocyte/macrophage lineage) Maturation Spread through circulation and reside in immature form (iDC) in skin (Langerhans cells), spleen, lungs, mucous membranes iDCs are relatively long-lived, but present in low numbers iDCs are highly phagocytic, pinocytic and endocytic, with low ability to activate T cells Endocytosis mediated by TLR and other receptors They may also acquire antigen through gap junctions with other cells Upon encountering antigen, they migrate to secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) and mature, gaining the ability to strongly stimulate T cells and becoming less endocytic/phagocytic. DCs may be only cells capable of activating naïve T cells DC activity can determine which type of T H response is produced Most potent APC i.e. in an assay to detect T cell activation (as measured by ability to kill targets, IL-2 production, proliferation, etc.), DCs are more potent on a per cell basis than B cells or Macrophages Stimulate B cells, CD4 and CD8 T cells directly Cytokine production – help control Th subtype fate of T H cells
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Antigen display and iccosomes Immature Dendritic cells will be found in or near mucosal surfaces (as well as other places) iDCs are highly phagocytic and pinocytic Dendritic cells have receptors which can bind antigen to the surface of a DC or iDC. Some include DC-SIGN, various constant region receptors, complement receptors or even antibodies (see section on exosomes) As the iDC matures, it stops phagocytosis – antigens still bound on the surface may remain there Once the DC/iDC reaches the lymph node, the antigen on its surface is displayed to surrounding cells, most importantly, a lot of naïve B cells A B cell with antigen specificity through its BCR will stick to the antigen(s), and possibly endocytose it. The B cell is then in a strongly activating microenvironment – it’s in intimate contact with Dendritic cells and probably Th cells as well.
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This note was uploaded on 07/24/2009 for the course BIO 52035 taught by Professor Edsatterwhite during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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29 BIO 326R Dendritic Cells - BIO 326R Dendritic cells and...

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