Momentum - Momentum We have now looked at force and energy....

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Momentum We have now looked at force and energy. We want to define a new quantity that helps connect the two: Momentum . Physically, momentum is a measurement of an object's tendency to continue in motion at a constant velocity. If the force and energy are linear, then we are talking about linear momentum . We write this mathematically as p = m v (13.1) If the force and energy are rotational, then we are talking about angular momentum , which is written mathematically as L = I ϖ How is the momentum related to kinetic energy? Start with the definition of kinetic energy ( 29 m p m mv m v m mv E 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 = = = = (13.2) What about force and momentum? Start with ( 29 t p t v m t v m a m F = = = = this can be rewritten as d p = F dt Impulse Integrating both sides of the equation, we get
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= - 2 1 1 2 t t dt F p p (13.3) We define the right hand side of (13.3) to be the impulse, J . Physically, the impulse is the total amount of force applied to an object in order to change its momentum. From the definition, we can see that the impulse has units of Newton-seconds (N-sec). Let's look a little more closely at the impulse. Since the right hand side is an integral, all we are really determining is the area under a graph of F verses t . However, as long as the integral remains unchanged, the specific nature of the
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Momentum - Momentum We have now looked at force and energy....

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