LinearKinematics - Linear Kinematics Let us consider the...

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Linear Kinematics Let us consider the motion of an object. For simplicity, let us take an ideal object, which does not take up any real space, or interact with the rest of the world. To begin with, let us describe its position. In order to say where an object is, we must first define a coordinate system. This is known as a frame of reference . Frames of reference are wholly man made. They are artifacts that allow for easier description of the problem. Since we live in three dimensions, we describe the position of an object by stating how far away the object is from three separate coordinate axes. Again, for simplicity, let us consider one dimension only. Then in order to describe the position, we need only know the point on a number line where the object is at. The easiest way of seeing this is to look at a graph of the position as a function of time. If the object is not moving, then the graph would look like x t We see that the slope of an object at rest is zero. What if the object were moving at a constant speed? Then a graph of the speed as a function of time would be v t Similarly, intuition tells us that if something moves with constant speed, then it is changing position at a constant rate, and a graph of the position as a function of time looks like
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x t Here the slope of the line is a constant, and in fact is equal to the speed. Lastly, we can also ask what would happen if we let the speed change at a constant rate? A change in the speed of the object is called its acceleration. From before, we see that graphs of the speed and acceleration verses time would look like a t v t Notice that again the acceleration is the slope of the graph of the speed verses
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This note was uploaded on 07/24/2009 for the course PHY 092342 taught by Professor Knott during the Spring '09 term at Cosumnes River College.

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LinearKinematics - Linear Kinematics Let us consider the...

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