242Joo09w - 1 PSC 242 US Foreign Policy Hyung-min Joo...

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1 PSC 242 – US Foreign Policy Hyung-min Joo Department of Political Science DePaul University [email protected] Office: Lewis 1657 (773) 325-7570 Office Hours; MW 1:20-3:10 The purpose of this course is to investigate major theories in, a brief history of, and contemporary issues in American foreign policy. In the first section of the course, we will analyze competing theories in US foreign policy such as Economic Interdependence, Neo-liberal Institutionalism, Democratic Peace Theory and Realism. In particular, our focus will be on Realism while using John Mearsheimer’s book The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (2001). In the second section, we will investigate a brief history of US foreign policy from its independence to the end of the Cold War, while using Joyce P. Kaufman’s book A Concise History of US Foreign Policy (2006). Finally, in the last section of the course, we will try to apply those theories to contemporary issues in American foreign policy such as the Bush Doctrine, terrorism as a “new” source of threat, torture as a “new” solution for terrorists, the war in Iraq, the US role in the Arab- Israel conflict, the North Korean nuclear threat, the Iranian crisis, the so-called “humanitarian” intervention (the case for/against Dafur) and so on. The course is organized into 20 sessions with two meetings a week. In addition to lecture, the mode of the course is what I call “structured discussion.” For each session, I bring a list of key concepts, ideas, theories and other issues related to the assigned readings. Going through the list, I pose a host of questions and debatable propositions based on the readings. In response, students are expected to actively participate in the discussion of these critical issues. To avoid “chaos,” discussion during the session is structured as it progresses along the list that I have prepared in advance. To avoid “indoctrination,” however, class is conducted in a discussion mode whenever possible. Through this mutually interactive process, it is hoped that students acquire both proper understanding of the assigned readings and the ability to critically evaluate them. The grade for the course is based on class participation (20%), a take-home midterm (40%) and a take- home final (40%). Late submission (for midterm and final) will be penalized by a drop of one letter grade per day. Readings required for the course are available on the Library website either through “ e-journals ” or on e-reserve .” Some readings, which could not be put on the Library website due to copy right issues, are physically reserved ( On Reserve ) at the Library. Students are required to purchase the following books: John Mearsheimer, The Tragedy of Great Power Politics (New York: W. W. Norton, 2001) Joyce P. Kaufman, A Concise History of US Foreign Policy (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2006) Course Schedule January 5 : Introduction I. Theory January 7 : Liberalism – The “Official” US Foreign Policy? For a good summary of “Economic Interdependence Theory” and “Neo-liberal Institutionalism,” read
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242Joo09w - 1 PSC 242 US Foreign Policy Hyung-min Joo...

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