ACADPOL_Fall2008_POL141_Ortmayer

ACADPOL_Fall2008_POL141_Ortmayer - INTERNATIONAL POLITICS...

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Unformatted text preview: INTERNATIONAL POLITICS FALL TERM 2008 POL 14} DR. ORTMAYER “[G}iobalization is not simpiy a trend or a fad but is, rather, an international system. it is a system that has now repiaced the old Cold War system, and, like that Cold War system, globalization has its own rates and logic that today directiy or indirectiy influence the poiitics, environment, geopolitics and economics of virtually every country in the worid.” .- . _ . my .‘ -. 4 _‘ ‘.-H~-!-_ , . i -5 5, ‘Hm m_' ' 2;”. ;n ¢“-'_n m. i . . fl; __, ,..N_WWW..._._ .... - ALLENGES lN A NEW ERA u.» GLOBAL AND REGIONAL CH Scope and thectiyes of the Course An ancient Chinese proverb, “May you live in interesting times,” was intended as a curse. in the world of the Zist Century, it is an objective necessity. Major changes and dramatic developments have been occurring in former Soviet Eurasia, Europe, the Mid—East and around the giobe, forcing us to reconsider our notions of East and West, North and South. The opening decade of the new century continues an era of deveiopments which have witnessed exceptionally turbulent relations among nations: great wars have shaken civilization to its roots, terrorism flourished and the awesome menace of nuclear destruction remains. Some of the world’s most colorful figures stride the stage of internationai diplomacy: Putin, Sarkozy, Blair, Saddem Hussein, Quaddafi, Kim jong~il, Castro, etc. The nation—state itseif is being chailenged by a variety of emerging worid actors: MNCs, ethnic separatist groups, regionai and international organizations. One thing is certain, international politics take place in a virtual state of nature—there is no governing body or authority with the command and the power to make WOi'ld law or settle disputes. Power, threats, resources, determination, skill at the bargaining table and in negotiations of ail types, and luck (among other factors, including using one‘s wits) decide the fate of the successfui and unsuccessfui, of powerful and weak, of victor and vanquished. ********** *eeewweewa Given this perspective, POL '5 41 is designed as a wide—ranging introduction to the fields of international politics and foreign policy. Course readings, materials, and outline emphasize breadth of coverage in order: 1) to present and aoaiyze concepts and frameworks for making the complexity of internationai teiations POL 141 page 2 clearer and more comprehensible; 2) to provide an overview and discussion of the major issues and trends of contemporary world politics; 3) to give the student the opportunity to develop a more criticai awareness of the nature and intricacy of international events, and the perceptions and dilemmas of some of the most important international actors; and 4) to encourage the student to deveiop an interest in and understanding of international phenomena both within the context of the course and for reference in one's future studies, career and lifelong learning. "As of yet, no clearly defined system of power reiationships has developed in place or the bipolar system and the tight aiiiances of the said war period. Rather, a number of regionai power centers——Japan in Asia, Germany in Europe, Russia in central Eurasia, the United States in North America—«have emerged, each surrounded by a ciuster of associated states. These centers cooperate with each other in some matters and complete in others; states not aligned with any of the principal clusters manage as best they can." —-Michaei Klare, “New Challenges to Global Security” Readings: The following are considered reguired texts to be read in their entirety. ' Mark R. Am'stutz, ihe Rules of the Game: Emmet on [3 (Boulder: Paradigm, 2008) Mark R. Amstutz, ' Bolitics, 2nd ed., (Boston: McGraw-Hiii College, ,1999). John G. Stoessinger, Why nations Go lo War, 10th ed., (New York: Wadsworth, 2007) Case/Reader: “The Struggle for Peace: The Middle East,” (news reports, articies) Major selections will come from the following: Thomas L. Friedman, the l axes and the Qliye Ines, rev./exp. edition, (N.Y: Anchor, 2000) Recommended and seiections on library reserve from the foiiowing: Deborah J. Gerner, L w P l s: nfi'c Alexander, L. George, F r l P r institute of Peace, 1991) Robert Wendzel, international Reiations: A Policymaer Fogtis (N.Y.: Wiley, 1980) Annual Editions: World Politigs apps—gig; (Eighal Issiiss 29527—08 ' M. H. Greenberg , J. D. Olander, lntemational Reiations ihrgpgh Science Fiction (N.Y: New Viewpoints, 1978) v rPaie in a i n: o'r‘v Di lomac sanA , 2nd Ed. (Boulder: Westview, 1994) ive to War (Washington: US. *Students should read reguiariy the international reporting of one or more of the primary national / international newspapers / news services: (hardcopy or onwiine) NEW VORK TIMES, WASHINGTON POST, CHRISTEAN SCIENCE MONITOR, L08 ANGELx-is TEMES, BBC Worm Service, and especiain the London weekly: THE ECONOMIST I LiKE FOLLDNiNC-i THE news! rue: ewe ME WM 1 went: macs. news CRGMVLATionS mow t uoe seamen. Ceremonies. SOUND BiYi-S honoree am we srr stiu. FOR AN‘i seems DiSQU‘S‘Sm SQNDAL. See smarts no POPULNRiT‘i PUBUC is C‘iNiCAL or comm AND Boeing issues. Poms ALL PACKAGED As A SOAP Ascot POLiTiC‘S. - _ operas AND mess me: its rare EHTERTMNlNG . '\ “MS \3 AN. W COMMERTATURS ‘lOU CAN TEL iii-stem stein. Because it's Got in ARTlCtE. NEXT TO ms. CHART, POL 141 Page 3 Finaiiy, it is strongly recommended that students consult and read periodically from academic journals: EOREIGN POLICY, FOREIGN AEFAIRS, INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS, INTERNATEONAL ORGANIZATION, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL, INTERNATIONAL SECURITY, ORBIS, SAIS REVIEW, STRATEGIC REVIEW, SURVIVAL, THE WORLD TODAY, WORLD POLICY, WORLDVIEW, WORLD POLITICS and WORLD PRESS REVIEW (all avaiiable in Little Library) ‘k-k‘k-k-k“kir‘k‘k*‘k‘k'k‘k'lr‘k‘ir'k‘kuk‘a'k'kir‘kddrir‘k‘k‘k‘k‘ki’kir'k‘lr‘kir'k-k'kirintic-Ac'k*“k‘k‘k‘k'Itk‘k‘k‘k‘ir‘k‘k‘kfi'kir‘k'k'k‘k‘k‘k’k‘k‘irir Regain-email“: Students will complete a mid—term exam, primarily in essay format (25%——October 27/29), and a self— scheduied comprehensive final examination (40%) in similar format. in addition, occasional quizzes will be given on short (or no) notice to encourage students to stay informed of contemporary international politicai, economic, and diplomatic affairs, (together with participation i0~i 5%), Students will also be expected to read thoroughly and concurrently with class discussion the assigned materials (including any selected iibrary reserve readings, electronic and class handouts), and to participate activeiy in ciass discussions, exercises, and simulations. Each student will submit a researched policy paper (approximately 10 pages-“20%) and bibliography, taking the ers tiv f em r r in erna i nal i i — k , dealing with substantive problems of current international poiiticai/economic concern: ' Middle East peace, Israelis/Palestinians, Hamas/Hezbollah, Balkans, ethnic conflicts, southern Africa, China and Taiwan, Colombia and drugs, arms controi and proliferation, great power triangles in Asia, oil and energy politics, nuclear proliferation, internationai economic/trade conflicts, European integzation, security conflicts of former Soviet Union states, CAFTA/FTAA trade negotiations, WTO disputes, international environment/global warming," UN or G8 summits, terrorism, etc. (Suggested topics only) The policy paper will take into account modes ofanaiysis and decision making perspectives, as well as perceptual variabies, as iiiustrated in class and the readings, and other relevant information sources. (Due date: December 5; iate penaity: one letter grade per day; computer “excuses” are not valid.) ' .. Attended, iM POL 141 . Page 4 Course Outline: Throughout the term, the centrai analytical focus of the course will be the POLiCYMAKER (national, international, transnationai): What are the poiicymaker’s relevant perceptions? And misperceptions? What are his/her key goals and objectives? What capabilities does s/he command? What types of international political response can policymakers expect confronting their own chosen actions? How does one proceed to resolve international crises, disputes, problems? How does one measure success, or failure? What constitutes foreign policy? How is foreign poiicy made? Why is there so much international conflict? ' introduction: international Politics: Setting, Dynamics, and Nature of the Field Aug. 25~29 A. Political, Socio—Economic, and Technoiogical Dynamics B. Global issues: What are the problems/conflicts of the 20th & Zist centuries? C. Levels of Analysis: The General Framework D. Realism, idealism...Aiternative Perspectives / Schools of Thought E Applying Perspectives to the Real World: “Giobaiization”.....and more"... (Read: Friedman, Lexus and the Olive Tree, Part One, intro and chs. i, 3; Amstutz ch 1; AmstutzZ ch 1; Thucydides, “The Meiian Dialogue;” Larry Diamond, “State of Democracy at Beginning of the 215‘ Century;” Clifford Geertz, “Very Bad News” {NYRB} ) Semester Case Study: The North Korean Crisis / Darfur or Kosovo Weeks International Political Systems: Comgarisons and Conoogts Two—Three A. Historical international Poiiticai Systems (Systems Levei Variables) Sept. 1» B. The Balance of Power (Security, insecurity, and Power Politics) Sept. 12 C. Simuiated Systems: The Classicai State System / The Cold War D. The Contemporary Era: BimPoiarity, Poiycentrism, or Fragmentation? (Amstutz ch. 2, 5; AmstutzZ ch.6, 3—4; Stephen wait, “international Relations: One World, Many Theories;” Samuel P. Huntington, “The Clash of Civilizations?” Benjamin Barber, “Jihad or McWorld?") Weeks The Contemgorag international System Four-Five A. East and West / North and South / Post~9/‘i‘l Sept. i5-26 B. international Actors 3. Nations and-Nation~States 2. international and Regional Organizations: Common Markets, Cartels .... .. 3. Non-State Actors: Multinationai COrporations, Terrorist Groups C. Global issues Rejoined: Contending Perspectives D Problem Areas of Contemporary lnternationai Politics: The Systemic Perspective —— Middle East, Africa, Central America, Southwest Asia (Amstutz 3; Amstutza ch 2, TS; Stoessinger i~3; Handouts on Middie East and Earth Summits 1992/2002; F. Fukuyama, “Has History Started Again;” Hutchinson, “Past, Present, Future of Nation~8tate") i m teammate i _ "it: l a A PATTERN l , HERE l ‘ Week Six Sept. 29— October 3 Weeks SevenwEight Oct. 6 — ’E? Weeks Nine-Ten Oct. 20- Oct. 3’3 POL T41 Page 5 Causes and Effects of War: Theories, Orientations, Observations A. Social, Political, Historical Roots B. C. Multiple interpretations — Multiple Causation? Why Nations (30 to War? Causation and Analysis, Criticism and Critique (Stoessinger 4—7; Amstutz 4—5; AmstutzZ ch 1 i // Rosen 3r jones, “Causes of War;” G ordon Eklund, “To End All Wars;” Arthur Ciarke, “Superiority”——ail on reserve) Domestic Structure and Foreign Policy Perceptions and Misperceptions in the Modern World A. B. The Impact of Foreign Policy on the Domestic Environment C. D. (AmstutzZ 8—9; Gerner, fine i and, [we Pegpies, selections; Case: “The Struggle for Peace”) Case Study: israei and the Palestinians/lsraeli Foreign Poiicy Foreign Policy Making: Variabies, Problems and ideals A. Poreign Policy Process: Variables and Multiwperspectives B. The Rational Decision Maker and Foreign Affairs C. Policy-Making Eiites: Poiitical, Economic, and Otherwise D. Perceptions Reconsidered (National “Style”?) E. Bureaucracies and Bureaucratic imperative F. Public Opinion and Interest Groups G. Resources, Technology, Capabilities (Amstutz 6 — 7; Robert Wendzel, “Domestic lnfluences”«— reserve) Foreign Policy Making: The Interrelationships of Domestic and Foreign Policy POL 141 Page 6 “The creative personality is one that always looks on the world as fit for change and on himseif as. an instrument for change....lf the world is perfectiy all right the way it is, you have no place in it.” Weeks Eleven— Twelve Nov. 3~i 4 Weeks Thirteen- Fourteen Nov. 17 — Dec. 5 Week Fifteen Dec. 8 e '10 «Jacob Bronowski Foreign Policy Implementation A. Policy and the Choice Dilemmas: Game Theory Perspectives Zero—Sum Games, Prisoner’s Dilemma, Chicken (and more) Strategies and Their Outcomes: The Feedback Cycle Implementing Decisions-and Policy . Game Theory and Policy Decisions . Cases: india, Pakistan and Nuciear Proliferation / Steel Tariffs [Trade] (AmstutzZ ch 10, 16; Hayford Pierce, “Unlimited Warfare”v—reserve) moon International Conflict and Conflict Resolution A. Conflict and Cooperation: Policy as a Bit of Both B. The Post~Coid Wa;r World Order C. international Economic Conflicts D. The Prospects of Negotiation/ Diplomacy of intervention E. Coercive Diplomacy for a New Wotid Order? (case briefing) F. I Case Studies in Ethnic Conflict and International Affairs (Amstutz 8~9; “Coercive Dipiomacy: Scope and Limits in the Contemporary World”: Will Moore, “Ethnic Minorities and Foreign Policy;” J. Wanandi, “indonesia: A Faiied State?” AmstutzZ ch 7) ‘ Case: “North Korea: War or Deal?” Cases: “lntemationai Bimensions of Ethnic Conflicts” Contemporag Policy FocussResolving Current [P Conflicts (Middle East, Sri Lanka, Chechnya, lndonesia, Darfur and other cases; handouts) mean can _ magnets? emanates! not? ...
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This note was uploaded on 07/25/2009 for the course POLS 101 taught by Professor All during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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ACADPOL_Fall2008_POL141_Ortmayer - INTERNATIONAL POLITICS...

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