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Betsill232 - POLS 232 International Relations Fall 2007 MWF...

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POLS 232 International Relations, Fall 2007 MWF 9-9:50; Clark A102 Instructor: Dr. Michele Betsill Contact Info: Clark B350; 491-5270; [email protected] Office Hours: W 10-12; R 1-2 and by appointment Teaching Assistants: Timothy Ehresman, Clark C326, 491-3882; Office Hours: W 12-2 and F 10-11; [email protected] Catherine Olukotun, Clark C 348; Office Hours M 1-3 and T 1-2; [email protected] COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will introduce students to the study and practice of international relations (IR). IR is the study of interactions between countries, international organizations, multi-national corporations, non-governmental organizations, cultural communities and networks in the world political system. Using the analytical tools and theories that comprise the discipline of IR, we will seek to understand the nature of these actors and explain why they behave in certain ways when confronted with a variety of problems, with particular focus on the current issues on the world agenda. This course will rely heavily on active student participation. Formal lectures will be kept to a minimum. Instead, students will work as a community of individual learners to develop and communicate knowledge and understanding of IR. Course sessions will often consist of interactive discussions, reflection activities, simulations, etc. designed to enhance students’ comprehension of course concepts as well as oral and written communication and critical thinking skills. COURSE OBJECTIVES 1. To introduce students to the field of international relations. By the end of the semester, students should be able to identify the major theories and analytical tools used in the study of IR and the major elements of the international system (actors, institutions, rules/norms, etc.). Students should also be able to discuss the basic parameters of some of the major issues facing the international community today. 2. To help students develop and strengthen critical thinking skills. By the end of the semester, students should be able to synthesize and evaluate positions and apply the theories and concepts used in the study of IR to understand current issues. 3. To enhance the ability of students to become active and engaged citizens. By the end of the semester, students should be able clearly communicate their views of major issues facing the international community and participate in thoughtful discussions of world politics.
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