PS376 - American Political Thought Since the Civil War...

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1 American Political Thought Since the Civil War Political Science 376 Spring 2009 Andrew Murphy, 508 Hickman Hall (Douglass Campus) armurphy@polisci.rutgers.edu Class meeting times: MTh 12:35-1:55 Office Hours: Thursday, 2:00-4:00, 508 Hickman Hall Other times available by appointment Political Science 376 explores the many ways in which Americans from the end of the Civil War down to our own day have thought, argued, and fought about the meaning of their own community. These debates have covered a variety of important topics, including the rights that Americans ought to enjoy; who should count as a citizen; the appropriate relationship between American religion and politics; the contentious relationship between labor and capital; and the qualities that make the United States distinctive among the nations of the world. Required texts: (ordered at Cook/Douglass Co-op Bookstore) John Dewey, Liberalism and Social Action . Prometheus Books. ISBN 978-1573927536 W. E. B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk . Dover. ISBN 978-0486280417. Milton Friedman, Capitalism and Freedom . University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0226264219. William Rauschenbusch, Christianity and the Social Crisis in the Twenty-First Century . 2008 reprint, Harper. ISBN 978-0061497261. Judith Shklar, American Citizenship: The Quest for Inclusion . Harvard. 978-0674022164 William Graham Sumner, What Social Classes Owe to Each Other . Caxton. ISBN 978-0870041662. Thorstein Veblen,
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PS376 - American Political Thought Since the Civil War...

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