Superslow_training___Hot_Topic

Superslow_training_ - Superslow Training Beau K Greer PhD CSCS This paper was presented as part of the NSCA Hot Topic Series All information

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Unformatted text preview: Superslow Training Beau K. Greer, PhD, CSCS This paper was presented as part of the NSCA Hot Topic Series. All information contained herein is copyright© of the NSCA. www.nsca-lift.org Hot Topics: Superslow Training 2 www.nsca-lift.org Introduction Throughout the brief history of the fitness industry, many individuals have continually searched for the elusive "secret," a fast and efficient workout or exercise that will maximize benefits while minimizing the duration they must actually spend engaged in physical activity. In fact, most marketing campaigns for particular exercise equipment or programs aimed at the general population utilize the strategy of promoting a superior workout as compared to a "traditional" one, and in less time. Not surprisingly, the developers of relatively new forms of resistance training collectively known as Superslow exercise have similar claims regarding the efficacy of their own program (7,9,15). [Note: formally, Superslow ® training is a trademarked commodity, but for the purpose of this article, the term "Superslow" will be applied to several exercise regimes that are characterized by the guidelines below]. What is Superslow training? The Superslow resistance training philosophy is multifaceted; generally, it involves 4-10- second eccentric (when the muscle is lengthening; i.e. the "negative" portion of a lift) and 10-second concentric (when the muscle is shortening) muscle actions. Each exercise is performed for only one set, which typically lasts approximately 80-160 seconds. Aerobic work is not included in the program and is actually viewed as ineffective at fat loss by many Superslow proponents (7,9,15). The Superslow regime is touted as a superior workout as compared to weight training of more "traditional" speeds because its slow speed is supposedly safer and momentum is reduced throughout the lift. Additionally, since metabolism is elevated for a longer period of time post- resistance training versus aerobic training (2), Superslow advocates claim that it is the best way to achieve a reduction in body fat (7,9,15). Does Superslow training work? To date there has been only one peer-reviewed study demonstrating that a Superslow regime would be better at developing muscular strength as compared to a traditional one. Over the course of 8-10 weeks, a group training in accordance with Superslow guidelines had a 50% greater increase in strength than one training at a "regular" speed (13). However, the two groups were tested for strength using different protocols; consequently, the only conclusion that can be drawn from this study is that Superslow training will make someone better at Superslow training, which is of little practical value. of little practical value....
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This note was uploaded on 07/26/2009 for the course 3534 3535 taught by Professor Nelson during the Spring '09 term at LSU.

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Superslow_training_ - Superslow Training Beau K Greer PhD CSCS This paper was presented as part of the NSCA Hot Topic Series All information

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