Week 4 Network Concepts

Week 4 Network Concepts - IP Addressing Reading on...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IP Addressing Reading on Networking Concepts Section 1: Introduction to Networks Section 2: Network Media Section 3:    Network Storage and Protocols Section 4:    Network Topologies and Operating Systems Section 5:    
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Wide Area Networks   
Background image of page 2
Section 1:  Introduction to Networks Networking involves connecting computers for the purpose of sharing information and resources. Today,  networks are everywhere. No longer are they a technical topic for IT professionals. We all use them daily.  In the workplace, almost all computers are networked to share data, printers, and an Internet connection.  At home, we attend class and shop on the Internet. The Internet is the largest network in the world and it  uses a network language called TCP/IP protocol that is used even in the simplest home network to share  a broadband connection (explained later). Networks can be limited to a radius of 100 meters (Local Area Networks or LAN’s) or can span hundreds  of miles (Wide Area Networks or WAN’s).  There are many possible choices for network design,  connections and related software. This reading covers a lot of material, but the concepts that are covered  form the essence of the features of networking.   Workstations and Servers A laptop or a desktop normally is a stand alone computer (with no Internet connection), which most of us  are used to. However, if connected to a network (even the Internet is a network), this computer becomes a  “workstation” or "host" or "client." If connected to a client-server network, it becomes a “client” of the  "server," since the server provides files and applications to the client.  While servers are typically configured a bit differently than a typical computer, most modern day  computers are capable of being servers. It depends on the operating system that is loaded onto server.  The Operating system is mandatory software each machine needs to allow the user to interact with its  hardware components, such as the monitor, hard disk drives, sound card, etcetera.    If a computer has Windows 2003 Server loaded on the computer, for example, the computer can be  classified as a server.  If the computer serves as a “domain controller” that is administers or “controls” a  group of client machines on a network, it becomes the “server” in a “client-server” network. Server  software you can purchase and practice on at home is Windows 2003 Server, the trial version.  Server 2003 can be purchased on the Internet for about $700. Less expensive server software would be  Linux Server, also available over the Internet, at some websites for free. Linux is "open source" software, 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 07/27/2009 for the course BIS 311 taught by Professor Marshburn during the Fall '08 term at DeVry Cincinnati.

Page1 / 24

Week 4 Network Concepts - IP Addressing Reading on...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online