lec24 - Lecture 24 A Brief History of Computer Science...

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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 1 Lecture 24 A Brief History of Computer Science (with thanks to Prabhakar Ragde)
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 2 Why History? • No shortage of good stories • It helps us understand the way things are • It helps us deal with the way things might be • But where to begin?
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 3 The Dawn of Computation Babylonian cuneiform (circa 2000 B.C)
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 4 Early Computation • “Computer” = human being performing computation • Euclid’s algorithm for greatest common divisor, circa 300 B.C. • Al-Khwarizmi’s books on algebra using Hindu-Arabic numerals, circa 800 A.D • Isaac Newton (1643-1727)
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 5 1801: Jacquard loom • Loom: weaves fabric • Design of fabric determined by instructions on punched cards • Specification and execution are separated
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 6 Charles Babbage England, 1791-1871 1819: Difference Engine (machine for tabulating polynomials) Babbage’s design was too ambitious 1834: Analytical Engine (general-purpose computing device)
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 7 Ada Augusta Byron • England, 1815-1852 • Assisted Babbage in explaining and promoting his ideas • Wrote articles describing operation and use of the Analytical Engine • The first computer scientist?
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 8 Difference Engine Around 1990 Around 1880
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 9 1928: David Hilbert Goal of mathematics: to formally prove statements such as “Every even number is the sum of two prime numbers.” Proof: finite sequence ofdeductions from axioms Ideally: every statement can either be proved true or false
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 10 Hilbert’s questions • Is mathematics consistent? If so, we can’t prove both a statement and its opposite. • Is mathematics complete? If so, we can either prove a statement, or prove its opposite. Nothing is unprovable. • Is there a procedure that can determine the truth or falsity of any mathematical statement?
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CS125 Course Notes Lecture 24, Slide 11 1930: Kurt Gödel’s answers Surprising answers: – Mathematics cannot prove itself consistent – If consistent, mathematics
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This note was uploaded on 07/27/2009 for the course MATH 135 taught by Professor Andrewchilds during the Fall '08 term at Waterloo.

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lec24 - Lecture 24 A Brief History of Computer Science...

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