Lecture 22--Association cortex

Lecture 22--Association cortex - The Association Cortex &...

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The Association Cortex & Cortical Lateralization QuickTime o and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Visual cortex Auditory cortex Motor cortex Somatosensory cortex Most of the cortex in the mammalian brain is association cortex Association cortex was defined as “not sensory or motor.” Believed to be site of Pavlovian associations between sensory (stimulus) and motor (response) cortex.
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Parietal cortex: attention and orientation of the body in the world inputs from visual, auditory and somatosensory cortex
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Sensory neglect: right parietal deficit
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Localization of lesion site in 8 patients with sensory neglect
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Lateralization in parietal function QuickTime A and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime k and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Lateralization of parietal function: confirmed by fMRI
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Selective attention in monkeys
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Agnosias: higher order perceptual (not sensory) deficits. Simultanagnosia (bilateral dorsal parietal damage): difficulty recognizing complex visual patterns with multiple parts even though each part can be recognized when presented alone.
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Selective inabilities to recognize faces were reported throughout the 18th century , and included case studies by Hughlings Jackson and Charcot . However, the term prosopagnosia was first used in 1947 by Joachim Bodamer, a German neurologist . He described a 24-year old man who suffered a bullet wound to the head and lost his ability to recognise his friends, family, and even his own face. However, he was able to recognize and identify them through other sensory modalities such
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This note was uploaded on 07/31/2009 for the course BIO 365R taught by Professor Draper during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas.

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Lecture 22--Association cortex - The Association Cortex &...

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