Rose Scent_Genomics Approach to Discovering Novel Floral Fragrance_Related Genes

Rose Scent_Genomics Approach to Discovering Novel Floral Fragrance_Related Genes

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The Plant Cell, Vol. 14, 2325–2338, October 2002, www.plantcell.org © 2002 American Society of Plant Biologists GENOMICS ARTICLE Rose Scent: Genomics Approach to Discovering Novel Floral Fragrance–Related Genes Inna Guterman, a Moshe Shalit, a,b Naama Menda, a Dan Piestun, a Mery Dafny-Yelin, a Gil Shalev, a Einat Bar, b Olga Davydov, c Mariana Ovadis, a Michal Emanuel, a Jihong Wang, d Zach Adam, a Eran Pichersky, d Efraim Lewinsohn, b Dani Zamir, a Alexander Vainstein, a and David Weiss a,1 a Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Faculty of Agricultural, Food, and Environmental Quality Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100, Israel b Division of Aromatic Plants, Agricultural Research Organization, Newe Ya’ar, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay 30095, Israel c Department of Plant Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100, Israel d Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 For centuries, rose has been the most important crop in the floriculture industry; its economic importance also lies in the use of its petals as a source of natural fragrances. Here, we used genomics approaches to identify novel scent- related genes, using rose flowers from tetraploid scented and nonscented cultivars. An annotated petal EST database of z 2100 unique genes from both cultivars was created, and DNA chips were prepared and used for expression analy- ses of selected clones. Detailed chemical analysis of volatile composition in the two cultivars, together with the identi- fication of secondary metabolism–related genes whose expression coincides with scent production, led to the discov- ery of several novel flower scent–related candidate genes. The function of some of these genes, including a germacrene D synthase, was biochemically determined using an Escherichia coli expression system. This work dem- onstrates the advantages of using the high-throughput approaches of genomics to detail traits of interest expressed in a cultivar-specific manner in nonmodel plants. INTRODUCTION Flower fragrance is a composite character that is deter- mined by a complex mixture of low-molecular-mass volatile molecules. For many years, research into flower fragrance focused on its chemical elucidation (Knudsen et al., 1993), and as a result, hundreds of compounds were identified. Most of these compounds belong to three major biosyn- thetic pathways: phenylpropanoids, fatty acid derivatives, and terpenoids (Croteau and Karp, 1991). Although the complete pathways leading to the final products have not been characterized, common modifications such as hydroxy- lation, acetylation, and methylation have been described (Dudareva, 2002). No convenient plant model system that allows chemical
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2009 for the course HORT hor-11-12 taught by Professor Park during the Spring '09 term at A.T. Still University.

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Rose Scent_Genomics Approach to Discovering Novel Floral Fragrance_Related Genes

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