Radiomutants of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) of the Lady group_ RAPD analysis of

Radiomutants of - Radiomutants of chrysanthemum Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev of the Lady group RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity J

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Unformatted text preview: Radiomutants of chrysanthemum ( Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) of the Lady group: RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity J. Lema-Rumin ´ ska 1 , M. Zalewska 1 and Z. Sadoch 2 1 Department of Ornamental Plants and Vegetable Crops, University of Technology and Agriculture in Bydgoszcz, Bernardyn ´ ska 6, PL-85-029 Bydgoszcz, Poland, E-mail: [email protected]; 2 Plant Breeding and Acclimatization Institute, Powstan ´ co ´ w Wielkopolskich 10, PL-85-950 Bydgoszcz, Poland With 1 figure and 3 tables Received February 5, 2003/Accepted February 3, 2004 Communicated by G. Forkmann Abstract Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to study the molecular characterization of 10 new radiomutants of chrysanthemum. The original cultivar Ô Richmond Õ differed in genetic distance from its Lady group mutants. The analysis of genetic similarity indices revealed low diversity within the radiomutants. The dendrogram obtained after cluster analysis separated the new cultivars as a group that differed from the original cultivar Ô Richmond Õ . The Lady group cultivars, derived from one original cultivar by radiomu- tation, could be distinguished from each other by using RAPD markers of only a single primer or sets of two or three primers. Polymerase chain reaction analysis proved the efficiency of the RAPD method for DNA fingerprinting of the original cultivar Ô Richmond Õ and its new radiomutants. Key words: Dendranthema grandiflora — radiomutants — RAPD — DNA fingerprinting — identification Chrysanthemum is one of the most essential ornamental plants in horticulture. It was first bred in China around 2500 years ago. The garden chrysanthemum is hexaploid with 54 chro- mosomes (Nazeer and Khoshoo 1983) and has a self-incom- patibility system (Drewlow et al. 1973), hence new cultivars are difficult to obtain by crossing and they are propagated vegetatively by cuttings. Today sources of new cultivars are the appearance of spontaneous mutants or the creation of transgenic plants. Another method of obtaining new cultivars of chrysanthemums is mutation breeding (Broertjes et al. 1976, Zalewska and Jerzy 1997, Ahloowalia and Maluszynski 2001). The emergence of new cultivars is closely connected with the problem of identifying them and distinguishing between them. Traditionally, the identification of ornamental plant cultivars has been based on morphological characters and, in particular, on the colour of the inflorescence, but this method needs the plants to be seen in flower and it is very subjective. A better method involves DNA markers e.g. random amplified poly- morphic DNA (RAPD), utilizing polymerase chain reactions (PCR). The fact that only small samples derived from the leaves are sufficient for analysis also confirms greater applica- bility of the method for identifying cultivars as early as the cutting stage....
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This note was uploaded on 08/01/2009 for the course HORT hor-11-12 taught by Professor Park during the Spring '09 term at A.T. Still University.

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Radiomutants of - Radiomutants of chrysanthemum Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev of the Lady group RAPD analysis of the genetic diversity J

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