Unit 2 Notes.docx - Introduction During the Baroque era(1...

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Introduction:During the Baroque era (1 600-1 750) the musical language of tonality became fully developed. In this lesson we will consider ingreater detail intervals, triads, and chord progressions, exploring how these musical elements contributed to the development of tonality.Later in the lesson we will listen to an early Baroque composition, an opera aria by the English composer Henry Purcell, examining various aspects of the music that contribute to the greatness of the work, while illustrating the concepts introduced in this lesson.Lesson Objectives:Upon completion of Lesson 5, students will be able to:recognize that tonality became fully developed in the Baroque eradefine an interval as the distance between two pitchesrecognize an interval by its numeric sizedifferentiate between the quality of an interval and its numeric sizeidentify the 1st, 4th, 5th, and 8th as the intervals that can be Perfectidentify the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th as the intervals that can be Major or minorrecognize the three qualities of 1st, 4th, 5th, and 8th intervals: diminished, Perfect, and Augmentedrecognize the four qualities of 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th intervals: diminished, minor, Major, and Augmentedrecognize the importance of intervals in the establishment of tonalityrecognize 2nd and 3rd intervals as Major or minorrecognize that a 2nd interval inverts to a 7th interval; interval inversionrecognize that a 3rd interval inverts to a 6th interval; interval inversiondifferentiate between a Major triad and a minor triad
recognize that a triad consists of a root, third, and fifthrecognize diatonic triadsrecognize “6-3” chordsrecognize “6-3” chords and root position major and minor triads as the essential consonant harmonies in tonalityrecognize a chord progressionrecognize a homophonic texturerecognize the Authentic Cadence and the Half Cadence as essential to tonal musicidentify an Authentic Cadence and a Half Cadencerecognize the prominence of the outer voices in the Baroque styleof musicrecognize the relationship between the tonic (I) and the dominant(V) as the defining characteristic of tonalityrecognize the musical meaning inherent in tonality and our common responses to major and minor keysrecognize Henry Purcell as one of England’s greatest composers during the Baroque erarecognize Purcell’s “Dido’s Lament” as one of the great arias of Baroque operarecognize basso ostinato as a type of continuous variationrecognize a chromatic descent from tonic to dominantIntervals: Numeric SizeSimply put, an interval is the distance between two pitches.From our examination of intervals so far, we know that the numeric size of an interval (that is, the number) is always determined by the letter names of the pitches. Let’s review this in a few different ways.

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