_Signal_FAQ03_Bandwidth - What is the bandwidth of a signal...

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What is the bandwidth of a signal? The term bandwidth is a general one that is used to describe the width or extent a spectrum ( 29 f X occupies in the frequency domain. Since a real signal has a magnitude spectrum that is symmetric with respect to 0 = f , and has a phase spectrum that is anti-symmetric with respect to 0 = f , the positive spectrum for 0 f (or sometimes called the one-sided spectrum) is sufficient in the evaluation of the bandwidth for a signal that is real. For convenience, this is often done, resulting in a “one-sided” bandwidth or simply bandwidth that is based on the one-sided spectrum. Of course, if the signal is complex or when there is a need to consider the spectrum over both positive and negative frequencies (that is, a two-sided spectrum), we will end up with a “two-sided” bandwidth. In general, there is no universal usage, and one just has to be consistent when comparing bandwidths of different signals. As an example, consider the spectrum
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_Signal_FAQ03_Bandwidth - What is the bandwidth of a signal...

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