_Signal_FAQ16_Analog_to_Digital_Converter

_Signal_FAQ16_Analog_to_Digital_Converter - What is an A/D...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is an A/D Converter? An A/D or analog to digital converter is a device that converts an analog signal into a bit stream that represents a digital signal. A common example is the A/D used in digitizing speech signal in, say, a GSM handphone. In such applications, the signal is first filtered to have a bandwidth of 3.4 kHz (or with a spectrum from 4 . 3 - to 3.4 kHz). An A/D at 8 kHz sampling frequency and 8-bit resolution can then be used to convert the filtered analog signal into a digital bit stream before the latter are transmitted digitally. With a sampling frequency of 8 kHz, the A/D will sample the input analog signal at 8000 uniformly spaced sampling instants to produce 8000 digital samples every second. With a resolution of 8-bit per sample, each digital sample will be represented by using an 8-bit integer. The bit stream that results will therefore be at the rate of 64000 bit per second or 64 kbps. Another common application is the digitization of stereo audio signals using the CD system. In this application, music or audio signal with a bandwidth of 20 kHz is digitized using an appropriate A/D at a sampling frequency of 44.1 kHz and a resolution of 16-bit per
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 3

_Signal_FAQ16_Analog_to_Digital_Converter - What is an A/D...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online