How Traditional Training Methods are Incorporated into Training Design

How Traditional Training Methods are Incorporated into Training Design

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Unformatted text preview: How Traditional Training Methods are Incorporated into Training Design Constraints | How to Develop Training Objectives | Transfer of Knowledge | Traditional Training Methods | Case Studies and Simulations | OJT | Use of Audio Visual Tools | Summary | Study Tools Have you ever been sent to training and got back to your desk wondering why you had just wasted 5 days? While the training was interesting, perhaps it didn’t apply to you, required technology you didn’t have, or was for a system that you wouldn’t be using for months. Designing training is much like designing a portion of a software application - we just use different tools. Just as in software development, we need to do a requirements definition, a training needs analysis, which we studied last week. Once we have a needs analysis, there are some questions we need to ask related to organizational constraints. There is no need to develop elaborate training if the employees will not be allowed to attend it. This should have been covered during the planning process of the overall project, but if it wasn’t, we need to address those constraints now before we begin design. Questions to Consider When Designing Training • What method of training should we use? • How much time should we allot for the training? • How many trainees should we train at the same time? • Is training conducted on company time or overtime? • Is training voluntary or mandatory? • Should we use an on-site or off-site location for training? Constraints Since our training is part of a larger project that has been prioritized, we should have no issue with priority within the organization. The management and supervision of our users and the employees we need to train were identified as stakeholders of our project and should be on board. However, at this point it may have been a while since we had those prioritization discussions, so we might want to re-affirm the training plan. Again, budget for our training should have been part of the overall budget of our development project but we should make sure our training funds are still available. We also may have some legal and regulatory constraints. Do we have OSHA, Title VII (discrimination in the work place), or special consideration for ADA (American with Disabilities Act) requirements? Another less obvious constraint could be the attitude of the customer base. Perhaps they have a negative attitude toward training or a training technique. You may have to choose a different technique, or different techniques for different subgroups of users. These issues should have been uncovered during the needs analysis. We will also want to confirm the population of our user group and affirm that our original customer base has remained the same. Additionally, we will detail the individual tasks for creating the documentation and develop our training project plan. Below is a great guide for estimating the time required to prepare training....
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This note was uploaded on 08/02/2009 for the course BIS 360 taught by Professor Price during the Summer '09 term at DeVry Cincinnati.

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How Traditional Training Methods are Incorporated into Training Design

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