L1_intro

L1_intro - BME 100L Modeling cellular and molecular systems Introduction Instructor Lingchong You TAs Stephen Payne Pavel Yarmolenko What is a

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BME 100L Modeling cellular and molecular systems Introduction Instructor: Lingchong You TAs: Stephen Payne & Pavel Yarmolenko
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What is a model? Webster definition: Main Entry: 1mod·el Pronunciation: 'mä-d&l Function: noun Etymology: Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin modellus, from Latin modulus small measure, from modus 1 obsolete : a set of plans for a building 2 dialect British : COPY , IMAGE 3: structural design <a home on the model of an old farmhouse> 4: a usually miniature representation of something; also : a pattern of something to be made 5: an example for imitation or emulation 6: a person or thing that serves as a pattern for an artist; especially : one who poses for an artist 7: ARCHETYPE 8: an organism whose appearance a mimic imitates 9: one who is employed to display clothes or other merchandise : MANNEQUIN 10 a : a type or design of clothing b: a type or design of product (as a car) 11 : a description or analogy used to help visualize something (as an atom) that cannot be directly observed 12 : a system of postulates, data, and inferences presented as a mathematical description of an entity or state of affairs 13 : VERSION hemoglobin dN kN dEN dt =− EE dE kA dE dt AA dA vN dA dt gene circuit fashion BME100L
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Yet another model!
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Essentially, a model is an idealized representation of something in someway • This course: Mathematical models – idealized, mathematical representation of cellular processes as interacting networks (even this is a very broad definition) Specifically: We will treat each of such networks as a set of reactions, and describe them based on principles of thermodynamics and kinetics
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the cell human cell Bacterium E. coli ~1μm 4000 genes ~10μm 10,000 genes
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Cell as the ultimate computer with versatile function Genetic information in genome = operating system
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Genome to life: how information encoded in the genome manifest in the behavior (phenotype) of an organism?
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This note was uploaded on 08/03/2009 for the course BME 100 taught by Professor Yuan during the Spring '07 term at Duke.

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L1_intro - BME 100L Modeling cellular and molecular systems Introduction Instructor Lingchong You TAs Stephen Payne Pavel Yarmolenko What is a

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