11 - PROKARYOTIC DIVERSITY BIOL 4125 SPRING 2009 LECTURE 11...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PROKARYOTIC DIVERSITY BIOL 4125 SPRING 2009 LECTURE 11 The Proteobacteria Part 3
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Methylotrophs grow on compounds with no C-C bonds as a sole source of carbon and energy Methylotrophs that can use CH 4 are called methanotrophs. Methylotrophs are not autotrophs and most are obligate aerobes. Top: Type I membrane system (disc-shaped vesicles); γ -proteobacteria. Bottom: Type II membrane system (paired membranes along the periphery of the cell); α -proteobacteria
Background image of page 2
Where are methylotrophs/methanotrophs found? C 1 sources in nature: • methane produced by archaea • methanol produced by plants • methylated amines from degradation of fish and plant compounds • methyl halides and methyl sulfides produced by marine algae cs.hiram.edu/~obie; Greg Crowther
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Methanotrophs Methanotrophs oxidize CH oxidize CH 4 to CH to CH 3 OH via methane OH via methane monooxygenase monooxygenase (MMO) and use NADH (reducing power) to generate a proton motive (MMO) and use NADH (reducing power) to generate a proton motive force force FP – flavoprotein; cyt – cytochrome; Q – quinone NOTE: MMO is a membrane-associated enzyme
Background image of page 4
C 1 assimilation into cell material Serine pathway Type II RuMP pathway Type I The RuMP pathway is more efficient because all carbon from formaldehyde is incorporated into biomass. Formaldehyde is at the same oxidation state as cell material, so no reducing power is needed. Cell yield is therefore higher for type I methylotrophs than type II methanotrophs.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Most free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria are alpha, beta, or gamma Proteobacteria, but a variety of microbes in other phyla and the Archaea are capable of this process. Some members of the alpha subgroup form symbiotic associations with legumes, whereby they fix N 2 and receive carbon from the plant.
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/04/2009 for the course BIOL 4125 taught by Professor Christner during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

Page1 / 18

11 - PROKARYOTIC DIVERSITY BIOL 4125 SPRING 2009 LECTURE 11...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online