2001 - AP Physics C: Mechanics 2001 Free-Response Questions...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: AP Physics C: Mechanics 2001 Free-Response Questions The materials included in these files are intended for use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation in the classroom; permission for any other use must be sought from the Advanced Placement Program. Teachers may reproduce them, in whole or in part, in limited quantities, for face-to-face teaching purposes but may not mass distribute the materials, electronically or otherwise. These materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear here. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained herein. These materials were produced by Educational Testing Service (ETS), which develops and administers the examinations of the Advanced Placement Program for the College Board. The College Board and Educational Testing Service (ETS) are dedicated to the principle of equal opportunity, and their programs, services, and employment policies are guided by that principle. The College Board is a national nonprofit membership association dedicated to preparing, inspiring, and connecting students to college and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 3,900 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 22,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges, through major programs and services in college admission, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT™, the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®), and Pacesetter®. The College Board is committed to the principles of equity and excellence, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. Copyright © 2001 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. AP® PHYSICS C EQUATIONS FOR 2001 MECHANICS u = u0 + at 1 x = x0 + u0 t + at 2 2 2 2 u = u0 + 2a x − x0 0 ∑ F = Fnet = ma dp F= dt J = F dt = Dp p = mv F fric ≤ mN I IF W= • ds 1 mu 2 2 dW P= dt DUg = mgh K= ac = t u 2 = w2r r =r×F ∑ t = t net = Ia I I = r 2 dm = ∑ mr 2 rcm = ∑ mr ∑ m u = rw L = r × p = Iw 1 K = Iw 2 2 w = w0 + at q = q0 + w0 t + 1 at 2 2 Fs = − kx 1 Us = kx 2 2 2p 1 T= = w f m Ts = 2 p k l Tp = 2 p g Gm1m2 $ FG = − r r2 Gm1m2 UG = − r 5 a= F= f= h= I= J= K= k= l= L= m= N= P= p= r= s= T= t= U= u= W= x= m= q= t= w= a= acceleration force frequency height rotational inertia impulse kinetic energy spring constant length angular momentum mass normal force power momentum radius or distance displacement period time potential energy velocity or speed work position coefficient of friction angle torque angular speed angular acceleration ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 1 q1q2 4p 0 r 2 F E= q Q E • dA = F= 0 dV dr 1 V= 4p 0 E=− ∑ rii q i UE = qV = 1 q1q2 4p 0 r Q V k 0A C= d C p = ∑ Ci C= i 1 1 =∑ Cs Ci i dQ I= dt 1 1 Uc = QV = CV 2 2 2 rl R= A V = IR Rs = ∑ Ri 1 = Rp ∑ i i 1 Ri P = IV F M = qv × B B • d l = m0 I I Id l × B F= Bs = m0 nI fm = IB • dA dfm dt e = − L dI dt 12 U L = LI 2 e =− 2 A= B= C= d= E= e= F= I= L= l= n= area magnetic field capacitance distance electric field emf force current inductance length number of loops of wire per unit length P = power Q = charge q = point charge R = resistance r = distance t = time U = potential or stored energy V = electric potential u = velocity or speed r = resistivity fm = magnetic flux k = dielectric constant AP® PHYSICS C EQUATIONS FOR 2001 GEOMETRY AND TRIGONOMETRY Rectangle A = bh Triangle 1 A = bh 2 Circle A = pr 2 C = 2 pr Parallelepiped V = lwh Cylinder V = pr 2 l S = 2 prl + 2 pr 2 Sphere 4 V = pr 3 3 S = 4 pr 2 Right Triangle a 2 + b2 = c2 a sin q = c cos q = area circumference volume surface area base height length width radius c a 90 q b b c tan q = A= C= V= S= b= h= l= w= r= a b CALCULUS df d f du = dx du dx • 27 27 dn n −1 x = nx dx dx e = ex dx 1 d (1n x) = dx x d (sin x) = cos x dx d (cos x) = − sin x dx 1 n +1 xn dx = x , n ≠ −1 n +1 ex dx = ex I I I dx = 1n x x cos x dx = sin x I I sin x dx = − cos x 3 2001 AP® PHYSICS C: MECHANICS FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS PHYSICS C Section II, MECHANICS Time—45 minutes 3 Questions Directions: Answer all three questions. The suggested time is about 15 minutes for answering each of the questions, which are worth 15 points each. The parts within a question may not have equal weight. Show all your work in the pink booklet in the spaces provided after each part, NOT in this green insert. Mech 1. A motion sensor and a force sensor record the motion of a cart along a track, as shown above. The cart is given a push so that it moves toward the force sensor and then collides with it. The two sensors record the values shown in the following graphs. (a) Determine the cart’s average acceleration between t = 0.33 s and t = 0.37 s. (b) Determine the magnitude of the change in the cart’s momentum during the collision. (c) Determine the mass of the cart. (d) Determine the energy lost in the collision between the force sensor and the cart. Copyright © 2001 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Advanced Placement Program and AP are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 4 2001 AP® PHYSICS C: MECHANICS FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Mech 2. An explorer plans a mission to place a satellite into a circular orbit around the planet Jupiter, which has mass M J = 1.90 ™ 10 27 kg and radius R J = 7.14 ™ 10 7 m. (a) If the radius of the planned orbit is R, use Newton’s laws to show each of the following. i. The orbital speed of the planned satellite is given by u = ii. The period of the orbit is given by T = GM J . R 4p 2 R 3 . GM J (b) The explorer wants the satellite’s orbit to be synchronized with Jupiter’s rotation. This requires an equatorial orbit whose period equals Jupiter’s rotation period of 9 hr 51 min = 3.55 × 104 s. Determine the required orbital radius in meters. (c) Suppose that the injection of the satellite into orbit is less than perfect. For an injection velocity that differs from the desired value in each of the following ways, sketch the resulting orbit on the figure. (J is the center of Jupiter, the dashed circle is the desired orbit, and P is the injection point.) Also, describe the resulting orbit qualitatively but specifically. i. When the satellite is at the desired altitude over the equator, its velocity vector has the correct direction, but the speed is slightly faster than the correct speed for a circular orbit of that radius. ii. When the satellite is at the desired altitude over the equator, its velocity vector has the correct direction, but the speed is slightly slower than the correct speed for a circular orbit of that radius. Copyright © 2001 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Advanced Placement Program and AP are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 5 2001 AP® PHYSICS C: MECHANICS FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Mech 3. A light string that is attached to a large block of mass 4m passes over a pulley with negligible rotational inertia and is wrapped around a vertical pole of radius r, as shown in Experiment A above. The system is released from rest, and as the block descends the string unwinds and the vertical pole with its attached apparatus rotates. The apparatus consists of a horizontal rod of length 2L, with a small block of mass m attached at each end. The rotational inertia of the pole and the rod are negligible. (a) Determine the rotational inertia of the rod-and-block apparatus attached to the top of the pole. (b) Determine the downward acceleration of the large block. (c) When the large block has descended a distance D, how does the instantaneous total kinetic energy of the three blocks compare with the value 4mgD ? Check the appropriate space below. ____ Greater than 4mgD ____ Equal to 4mgD ____ Less than 4mgD Justify your answer. Copyright © 2001 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Advanced Placement Program and AP are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 6 2001 AP® PHYSICS C: MECHANICS FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS The system is now reset. The string is rewound around the pole to bring the large block back to its original location. The small blocks are detached from the rod and then suspended from each end of the rod, using strings of length l. The system is again released from rest so that as the large block descends and the apparatus rotates, the small blocks swing outward, as shown in Experiment B above. This time the downward acceleration of the block decreases with time after the system is released. (d) When the large block has descended a distance D, how does the instantaneous total kinetic energy of the three blocks compare to that in part (c) ? Check the appropriate space below. ____ Greater ____ Equal ____ Less Justify your answer. END OF SECTION II, MECHANICS Copyright © 2001 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Advanced Placement Program and AP are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 7 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/05/2009 for the course PHYS 101 taught by Professor Reich during the Spring '08 term at Johns Hopkins.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online