This article is about Ken Ravizza discussed some of the barriers to .docx - This article is about Ken Ravizza discussed some of the barriers to gaining

This article is about Ken Ravizza discussed some of the barriers to .docx

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This article is about Ken Ravizza discussed some of the barriers to gaining entry with a team or athletic organization. Briefly describe two of these barriers and how you feel like they could be handled in a constructive/positive manner? What additional barriers do you think could face an SPC starting to work with a team or athlete? (since this article was written in 1988 I wonder if you feel like anything has changed since Ravizza wrote this over 25 years ago, (there are no right or wrong answers to these questions. This question is intended to get you to think about the results of the study, raise questions that you might have) Gaining Entry With Athletic Personnel for Season-Long Consulting Kenneth Ravizza California State University-Fullerton Consulting issues that confront applied sport psychology personnel in gain ing entry to working with athletic teams on a long-term basis are discussed Barriers to entry are examined at the onset and it is emphasized that these obstacles must be overcome by all consultants. Strategies for overcoming such barriers include establishing respect and trust of key athletic personnel, gaining the head coach's respect, knowing the sport, becoming knowledge- able of the coach's orientation and team dynamics, gaining support at all levels of the organization, clarifying services to be provided, and making presenta tions to coaching staffs and athletes. Additional guidelines are discussed in an effort to better clarify the role of the applied sport psychology consultant These include clarifying one's own consulting needs, maintaining confiden
tiality, the need for open and honest communication, support demonstrated by coaches, and collecting research data while consulting. For the past 10 years I have worked extensively with elite athletes at inter collegiate, Olympic, and professional levels to enhance their performance through mental skills training. The programs I have developed are carried out on a season long basis.' In other words, from the point of implementation they involve a con- tinuous process throughout the season. In all these settings my goal has been to help athletes and coaches develop, individualize, and refine mental skills over time (up to 7 years with one team) so that mental skills become an integral tool to use during a variety of pressure situations. Mental skills, like physical skills, take time and self-discipline to develop. The foundation of my approach seeks to enhance performance by emphasizing that mental training is one component of the total program. This educational ap- proach is vital for equipping athletes with the mental skills to reach their full poten- tial. Specifically, it is important to emphasize performance enhancement because the sport psychologist is often labeled by the coaches as the professional who works with the head cases" or so-called "problem" athletes. I have learned much from the coaches and athletes with whom I have worked in these settings. Of particular significance was

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