Big_Radio_Makes_a_Grab_for_Internet_Listeners

Big_Radio_Makes_a_Gr - Big Radio Makes a Grab for Internet Listeners By JEFF LEEDS Published 2007 The New York Times Inc Last week a radio D.J

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Big Radio Makes a Grab for Internet Listeners By JEFF LEEDS Published: June 12, 2007 © 2007 The New York Times, Inc. Last week a radio D.J. known as Vibegrrl, who works the midday shift on Hot 99.5, a Washington pop station, offered her listeners the chance to receive tickets to see the rock band Hinder. But to win, they had to do more than dial in at the right moment. They first had to visit Hot 99.5’s Web site and identify the woman wearing a thong, as shown from behind, and then call the studio. (Unsurprisingly the answer was Britney Spears .) “Everybody’s on the Internet all day,” said Vibegrrl, whose real name is Lara Dua. “It would be just kind of not smart if we weren’t making that part of what we do.” Interaction with listeners used to be “very limited,” she added. Now, though, “I’m chatting and blogging and doing research and answering phones all at the same time.” After ceding ground (and potential advertising dollars) for years to an army of autonomous Internet radio stations, some of which are run from basements and spare bedrooms, the nation’s biggest broadcasters are now marching online, determined to corral the next generation of listeners. The result may be a showdown to define the future of the medium. Confronted by a slow erosion of listeners who are turning to iPods, podcasts and other sources for entertainment, the radio corporations are trying to merge their over-the-air music and D.J. chatter with the Web, adding online streams of their broadcasts and features already found on many independent Web-based stations. These include live chat rooms, blogs and MySpace-style social networking features. Late last month, CBS said it had paid $280 million to acquire Last FM (last.fm), a popular Web radio service where listeners can customize stations based on their personal taste, and also explore other users’ playlists. And Clear Channel, the biggest radio corporation, with a stable of more than 800 stations, has built miniature social networks
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course MEDIA 102 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Big_Radio_Makes_a_Gr - Big Radio Makes a Grab for Internet Listeners By JEFF LEEDS Published 2007 The New York Times Inc Last week a radio D.J

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